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‘Stress-busting’ groups for consultant psychiatrists

  • Jane M. Murdoch (a1) and John M. Eagles (a2)
Abstract
Aims and Method

To describe the formation and function of ‘stress-busting’ groups and report a survey on work-related stress among a small cohort of consultant psychiatrists.

Results

Of 37 questionnaires, 25 were returned and 16 respondents (64%) rated their overall level of stress at work as moderate or severe. Stressful factors included lack of staff, paperwork, high-risk patients, difficult/hostile relatives and job demands interfering with family life. The most helpful stress-reducing strategies were talking to colleagues for support and catharsis, outside interests, support from family and friends, effective time management and exercise. Among 15 current members of ‘stress-busting’ groups, 14 (93%) found these to be helpful. The most successful format in the ‘stress-busting’ groups was one of ‘problem-solving with ventilation of stresses'.

Clinical Implications

‘Stress-busting’ groups may constitute a helpful approach to work-related stress and a utilisation of the skills of psychiatrists to our mutual benefit.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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‘Stress-busting’ groups for consultant psychiatrists

  • Jane M. Murdoch (a1) and John M. Eagles (a2)
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