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Training in partnership: role of service users with intellectual disability and carers

  • Asit B. Biswas (a1), Lammata Bala Raju (a2) and Shaun Gravestock (a3)
Summary

The participation of service users with intellectual disability and carers is essential in medical and psychiatric training at all levels. It validates the training experience provided by incorporating service users' and carers' perspectives and their experience of mental illness/challenging behaviour, anxieties, interactions and feelings generated when dealing with professionals involved in their care, and also provides an understanding of expectations, views on met and unmet needs and how management options are best explained and communicated for meaningful participation in providing consent and in making treatment decisions. This article brings together the benefits of involving service users with intellectual disability and carers in teaching, discussing their roles as trainers, and providing practical tips to plan sessions as well as recognise and overcome barriers.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Training in partnership: role of service users with intellectual disability and carers

  • Asit B. Biswas (a1), Lammata Bala Raju (a2) and Shaun Gravestock (a3)
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