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Use of cognitive–behavioural therapy skills among trained psychiatrists

  • Graeme Whitfield (a1), Moira Connolly (a2), Alan Davidson (a3) and Chris Williams (a2)
Abstract
Aims and Method

Previous studies have suggested that despite the cost of attendance at postgraduate cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) courses, psychiatrists are unable to engage in CBT after qualification. A postal survey of psychiatrists with postgraduate CBT training currently practising in Scotland was performed to assess the levels of training and supervision that they provide, therapeutic CBT activity, and supervision and continued professional development that they receive.

Results

Of the 58 psychiatrists, 51 replied to the survey (88%). Less than half of the respondents supervised other staff. Although 43 (84%) engaged in some therapeutic CBT activity, only 25 (49%) received supervision for their own practice. The main reasons given for not engaging in CBT therapeutic activity were that there was inadequate ‘protected time’ and that CBT had not been included in ‘job plans'.

Clinical Implications

Psychiatrists can help to disseminate CBT skills. To do this, they require personal supervision, and time for the development and maintenance of therapeutic skills as well as for the training and supervision of others. This survey builds on the results of others and indicates that these requirements are currently being inadequately met.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Use of cognitive–behavioural therapy skills among trained psychiatrists

  • Graeme Whitfield (a1), Moira Connolly (a2), Alan Davidson (a3) and Chris Williams (a2)
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