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Working with people with personality disorder: utilising service users' views

  • Kimberley Barlow (a1), Stephen Miller (a2) and Kingsley Norton (a3)
Abstract
Aims and Method

To ascertain the views of people with personality disorder on their clinical interactions with professionals, to identify potential solutions to problematic interactions and to compile guidelines on how professionals could improve their interactions with these service users. Qualitative methodology was employed, comprising a modified nominal group technique with two iterative groups and ranking by importance the issues and themes raised.

Results

There were 13 service users from three separate personality disorder services who actively participated in a group discussion and iterative process. Collectively they indicated considerable areas of deficiency in the quality of their interaction and communication with professionals. These deficits were defined clearly enough to allow the construction of guidelines aimed at preventing or remedying such deficiencies.

Conclusions

The contribution of those people with personality disorder who took part in this study was sufficiently thoughtful to allow the development of guidelines that might help staff improve their interactions with such service users. From these guidelines, further training tools are being developed, which will be evaluated in the future. However, because not all those approached chose to participate, the views expressed might not be representative of this group as a whole.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
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Jones, J. & Hunter, D. (1995) Qualitative research: consensus methods for medical and health services research. BMJ, 311, 376380.
National Institute for Clinical Excellence (2004) Self-Harm: The Short-Term Physical and Psychological Management and Secondary Prevention of Self-Harm in Primary and Secondary Care. NICE. http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/CG16/guidance/cfm/English.
National Institute for Mental Health in England (2003a) Personality Disorder: No Longer a Diagnosis of Exclusion. NIMHE. http://www.nelmh.org/downloads/other_info/personality_disorder_diagnosis_of_exclusion.pdf
National Institute for Mental Health in England (2003b) Breaking the Cycle of Rejection: The Personality Disorder Capabilities Framework. NIMHE. http://www.spn.org.uk/fileadmin/SPN_uploads/Documents/Papers/personalitydisorders.pdf
Norton, K. & McGauley, G. (1999) Counselling Difficult Clients. Sage Publications.
Simpson, E. L. & House, A. O. (2003) User and carer involvement in mental health services: from rhetoric to science. British Journal of Psychiatry, 183, 8991.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Working with people with personality disorder: utilising service users' views

  • Kimberley Barlow (a1), Stephen Miller (a2) and Kingsley Norton (a3)
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