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Bulimia nervosa: treatment and short-term outcome

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 July 2009

L. K. George Hsu*
Affiliation:
Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
Diane Holder
Affiliation:
Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
*
1Address for correspondence: Professor L. K. G. Hsu, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 3811 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.

Synopsis

Fifty-six bulimia nervosa patients were treated by means of a behavioural approach and followed for at least one year after completion or dropping out of treatment. Outcome was encouraging in about half of the patients and several psychiatric indicators, such as duration of illness and response to treatment, were identified. The significance of the findings and unresolved methodological issues are discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1986

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