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The International Pilot Study of Schizophrenia: five-year follow-up findings1

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 July 2009

J. Leff*
Affiliation:
World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland
N. Sartorius
Affiliation:
World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland
A. Jablensky
Affiliation:
World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland
A. Korten
Affiliation:
World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland
G. Ernberg
Affiliation:
World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland
*
2 Address for correspondence: Dr Norman Sartorius, Division of Mental Health World Health Organization, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland.

Synopsis

A five-year follow-up of the patients initially included in the International Pilot Study of Schizophrenia was conducted in eight of the nine centres. Adequate information was obtained for 807 patients, representing 76% of the initial cohort. Clinical and social outcomes were significantly better for patients in Agra and Ibadan than for those in the centres in developed countries. In Cali, only social outcome was significantly better.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1992

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Footnotes

1

This paper on the 5-year follow-up of patients included in the International Pilot Study of Schizophrenia of the WHO was prepared on behalf of the collaborating investigators (see Appendix).

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