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    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Arora, Teresa and Taheri, Shahrad 2015. Sleep Optimization and Diabetes Control: A Review of the Literature. Diabetes Therapy, Vol. 6, Issue. 4, p. 425.


    Carvajal, Francisca Alcaraz-Iborra, Manuel Lerma-Cabrera, Jose Manuel Valor, Luis Miguel de la Fuente, Leticia Sanchez-Amate, Maria del Carmen and Cubero, Inmaculada 2015. Orexin receptor 1 signaling contributes to ethanol binge-like drinking: Pharmacological and molecular evidence. Behavioural Brain Research, Vol. 287, p. 230.


    Alcaraz-Iborra, Manuel Carvajal, Francisca Lerma-Cabrera, José Manuel Valor, Luis Miguel and Cubero, Inmaculada 2014. Binge-like consumption of caloric and non-caloric palatable substances in ad libitum-fed C57BL/6J mice: Pharmacological and molecular evidence of orexin involvement. Behavioural Brain Research, Vol. 272, p. 93.


    Zhang, Haoran Lian, Zhi Yan, Shiyan Bao, Yanping and Liu, Zhimin 2013. Different Levels in Orexin Concentrations and Risk Factors Associated with Higher Orexin Levels: Comparison between Detoxified Opiate and Methamphetamine Addicts in 5 Chinese Cities. BioMed Research International, Vol. 2013, p. 1.


    Trachtman, Joseph N. 2010. Vision and the hypothalamus. Optometry - Journal of the American Optometric Association, Vol. 81, Issue. 2, p. 100.


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The orexins/hypocretins: hypothalamic peptides linked to sleep and appetite

Abstract

The orexins/hypocretins are novel neuropeptides synthesized by neurons whose cell bodies are located in the lateral hypothalamus. Although these neurons are few in number, they send projections widely throughout the central nervous system (Kilduff & Peyron, 2000). There has been great excitement about the orexins/hypocretins from both the scientific and medical community. These peptides are remarkable in that they were discovered using state-of-the-art molecular techniques before their physiological actions were studied. Furthermore, there has been an exponential progress in our scientific knowledge of these peptides culminating in the orexins/hypocretins being linked to the sleep disorder, narcolepsy. With the importance of the orexins/hypocretins in sleep and arousal being increasingly recognized, it is likely that these peptides are altered by or contribute to several medical and psychiatric disorders.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Address for correspondence: Dr Shahrad Taheri, Department of Metabolic Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, 6th Floor, Commonwealth Building, The Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London W12 OHS.
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Psychological Medicine
  • ISSN: 0033-2917
  • EISSN: 1469-8978
  • URL: /core/journals/psychological-medicine
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