Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa
  • Access
  • Cited by 5
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Ishikawa, Midori Yokoyama, T. Nakaya, T. Fukuda, Y. Takemi, Y. Kusama, K. Yoshiike, N. Nozue, M. Yoshiba, K. and Murayama, N. 2016. Food accessibility and perceptions of shopping difficulty among elderly people living alone in Japan. The journal of nutrition, health & aging,


    Thomsen, Michael R. Nayga, Rodolfo M. Alviola, Pedro A. and Rouse, Heather L. 2016. The Effect of Food Deserts on the Body Mass Index of Elementary Schoolchildren. American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Vol. 98, Issue. 1, p. 1.


    Weintraub, Miranda Ritterman Kelley, Elizabeth A. Yen, Irene H. and Bozdech, Matthew 2016. Cardiovascular disease and access to nutritious food for safety net patients. Obesity Medicine, Vol. 2, p. 8.


    Taylor, Dorceta E. and Ard, Kerry J. 2015. RESEARCH ARTICLE: Food Availability and the Food Desert Frame in Detroit: An Overview of the City’s Food System. Environmental Practice, Vol. 17, Issue. 02, p. 102.


    Holzer, Jessica Canavan, Maureen and Bradley, Elizabeth 2014. County-level correlation between adult obesity rates and prevalence of dentists. The Journal of the American Dental Association, Vol. 145, Issue. 9, p. 932.


    ×

A food desert in Detroit: associations with food shopping and eating behaviours, dietary intakes and obesity

  • Katarzyna Budzynska (a1) (a2), Patricia West (a3), Ruth T Savoy-Moore (a4), Darlene Lindsey (a3), Michael Winter (a5) and PK Newby (a6) (a7) (a8)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980013000967
  • Published online: 07 May 2013
Abstract
AbstractObjective

Currently 67 % of the US population is overweight or obese and obesity is associated with several chronic medical conditions. Geographic areas where individuals lack access to healthy foods have been termed ‘food deserts’. The study aim was to examine if area of residence within Metro Detroit was associated with dietary intake, food and shopping behaviours, and BMI.

Design

Cross-sectional study.

Settings

Participants were recruited in the waiting area of four primary-care clinics.

Subjects

Individuals (n 1004) completed a questionnaire comprising four sections: demographics; personal health status including self-reported height and weight; a modified diet, transportation and shopping survey; and a subscale from the Diet and Health Knowledge Survey.

Results

Seventy-four per cent of participants were female and the mean age was 46·7 (sd 15·0) years. In univariate analyses, living in Detroit was associated with being African American, unemployment, less education, no regular exercise, worse health self-rating and obesity (P < 0·0005 for all). Participants living in Detroit had a 3·06 (95 % CI 1·91, 4·21) kg/m2 larger BMI compared with people living outside the city (P < 0·0005) in univariate analyses, but the effect was attenuated when adjusted for demographics, disease status, shopping and eating behaviours, dietary intakes and diet knowledge (β = −0·46 kg/m2, 95 % CI −2·23, 1·30 kg/m2, P = 0·60).

Conclusions

Overweight and obesity are highly prevalent both inside (82·9 %) and outside (72·8 %) the city of Detroit, presenting a major public health problem. However, living in this food desert was not significantly associated with BMI after potential covariates were considered.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      A food desert in Detroit: associations with food shopping and eating behaviours, dietary intakes and obesity
      Your Kindle email address
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      A food desert in Detroit: associations with food shopping and eating behaviours, dietary intakes and obesity
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      A food desert in Detroit: associations with food shopping and eating behaviours, dietary intakes and obesity
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email pknewby@post.harvard.edu
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

1.KM Flegal , MD Carroll , CL Ogden et al. (2010) Prevalence and trends in obesity among US adults, 1999–2008. JAMA 303, 235241.

2.KM Flegal , MD Carroll , CL Ogden et al. (2002) Prevalence and trends in the obesity among US adults, 1999–2000. JAMA 288, 17231727.

4.DM Smith , S Cummins , M Taylor et al. (2010) Neighborhood food environment and area deprivation: spatial accessibility to grocery stores selling fresh fruit and vegetables in urban and rural settings. Int J Epidemiol 39, 277284.

5.J Wardle , J Waller & MJ Jarvis (2002) Sex differences in the association of socioeconomic status with obesity. Am J Public Health 92, 12991304.

6.S Cummins & S Macintyre (2002) ‘Food deserts’ – evidence and assumption in health policy making. BMJ 325, 436438.

7.JP Stimpson , AC Nash , H Ju et al. (2007) Neighborhood deprivation is associated with lower levels of serum carotenoids among adults participating in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. J Am Diet Assoc 107, 18951902.

8.L Dubois & M Girard (2001) Social position and nutrition: a gradient relationship in Canada and the USA. Eur J Clin Nutr 55, 366373.

10.D Neumark-Sztainer , M Story , PJ Hannan et al. (2002) Overweight status and eating patterns among adolescents: where do youths stand in comparison with the Healthy People 2010 objectives? Am J Public Health 92, 844851.

11.S Shohaimi , A Welch , S Bingham et al. (2004) Residential area deprivation predicts fruit and vegetable consumption independently of individual educational level and occupational social class: a cross sectional population study in the Norfolk cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC-Norfolk). J Epidemiol Community Health 58, 686691.

12.M Lindström , BS Hanson , E Wirfält et al. (2001) Socioeconomic differences in the consumption of vegetables, fruit and fruit juices. The influence of psychosocial factors. Eur J Public Health 11, 5159.

13.H Billson , JA Pryer & R Nichols (1999) Variation in fruit and vegetable consumption among adults in Britain. An analysis from the dietary and nutritional survey of British adults. Eur J Clin Nutr 53, 946952.

14.JD Irala-Estévez , M Groth , L Johansson et al. (2000) A systematic review of socio-economic differences in food habits in Europe: consumption of fruit and vegetables. Eur J Clin Nutr 54, 706714.

15.P Wallström , E Wirfält , L Janzon et al. (2000) Fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to risk factors for cancer: a report from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Public Health Nutr 3, 263271.

16.KJ Joshipura , FB Hu , JE Manson et al. (2001) The effect of fruit and vegetable intake on risk for coronary heart disease. Ann Intern Med 134, 11061114.

17.RE Walker , CR Keane & JG Burke (2010) Disparities and access to healthy food in the United States: a review of food deserts literature. Health Place 16, 876884.

24.AV Diez-Roux , FJ Nieto , L Caulfield et al. (1999) Neighbourhood differences in diet: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. J Epidemiol Community Health 53, 5563.

26.T Pearson , J Russell , MJ Campbell et al. (2005) Do ‘food deserts’ influence fruit and vegetable consumption? – A cross-sectional study. Appetite 45, 195197.

28.PT James , R Leach , E Kalamara et al. (2001) The worldwide obesity epidemic. Obes Res 9, Suppl. 4, 228S233S.

29.S Obayashi , LJ Bianchi & WO Song (2003) Reliability and validity of nutrition knowledge, social-psychological factors and food label use scales from the 1995 Diet and Health Knowledge Survey. J Nutr Educ Behav 35, 8392.

30.R An & R Strum (2012) School and residential neighborhood food environment and diet among California youth. Am J Prev Med 42, 129135.

31.V Shier , R An & R Strum (2012) Is there a robust relationship between neighborhood food environment and childhood obesity in the USA? Public Health 126, 723730.

32.NO Kwate (2008) Fried chicken and fresh apples: racial segregation as a fundamental cause of fast food density in black neighborhoods. Health Place 14, 3244.

34.SC Gorber , M Tremblay , D Moher et al. (2007) A comparison of direct vs. self-report measures for assessing height, weight and body mass index: a systematic review. Obes Rev 8, 307326.

35.MF Kuczmarski , RJ Kuczmarski & M Najjar (2001) Effects of age on validity of self-reported height, weight, and body mass index: findings from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988–1994. J Am Diet Assoc 101, 2834.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords: