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    Tondeur, Melody C Salse, U Núria Wilkinson, Caroline Spiegel, Paul and Seal, Andrew J 2016. Rapid acceptability and adherence testing of a lipid-based nutrient supplement and a micronutrient powder among refugee children and pregnant and lactating women in Algeria. Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 19, Issue. 10, p. 1852.


    Sivasankaran, S 2013. Cardiovascular Diseases.


    Charles, Christopher V. Summerlee, Alastair J. S. and Dewey, Cate E. 2011. Iron content of Cambodian foods when prepared in cooking pots containing an iron ingot. Tropical Medicine & International Health, Vol. 16, Issue. 12, p. 1518.


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Acceptability and use of iron and iron-alloy cooking pots: implications for anaemia control programmes

  • Katherine Tripp (a1), Nancy MacKeith (a2), Bradley A Woodruff (a1), Leisel Talley (a3), Laurent Mselle (a4), Zahra Mirghani (a5), Fathia Abdalla (a5), Rita Bhatia (a6) and Andrew J Seal (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980009005928
  • Published online: 28 May 2009
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To evaluate the acceptability of iron and iron-alloy cooking pots prior to an intervention trial and to investigate factors affecting retention and use.

Design

Pre-trial research was conducted on five types of iron and iron-alloy pots using focus group discussions and a laboratory evaluation of Fe transfer during cooking was undertaken. Usage and retention during the subsequent intervention trial were investigated using focus group discussions and market monitoring.

Setting

Three refugee camps in western Tanzania.

Subjects

Refugee health workers were selected for pre-trial research. Mothers of children aged 6–59 months participated in the investigation of retention and use.

Results

Pre-trial research indicated that the stainless steel pot would be the only acceptable type for use in this population due to excessive rusting and/or the high weight of other types. Cooking three typical refugee dishes in stainless steel pots led to an increase in Fe content of 3·2 to 17·1 mg/100 g food (P < 0·001). During the trial, the acceptability of the stainless steel pots was lower than expected owing to difficulties with using, cleaning and their utility for other purposes. Households also continued to use their pre-existing pots, and stainless steel pots were sold to increase household income.

Conclusions

Pre-trial research led to the selection of a stainless steel pot that met basic acceptability criteria. The relatively low usage reported during the trial highlights the limitations of using high-value iron-alloy cooking pots as an intervention in populations where poverty and the availability of other pots may lead to selling.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email a.seal@ich.ucl.ac.uk
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3.R Galloway & J McGuire (1994) Determinants of compliance with iron supplementation: supplies, side effects, or psychology? Soc Sci Med 39, 381390.

6.AA Adish , SA Esrey , TW Gyorkos , J Jean-Baptiste & A Rojhani (1999) Effect of consumption of food cooked in iron pots on iron status and growth of young children: a randomised trial. Lancet 353, 712716.

8.PD Geerligs , BJ Brabin & AA Omari (2003) Food prepared in iron cooking pots as an intervention for reducing iron deficiency anaemia in developing countries: a systematic review. J Hum Nutr Diet 16, 275281.

9.PP Geerligs , B Brabin , A Mkumbwa , R Broadhead & LE Cuevas (2003) The effect on haemoglobin of the use of iron cooking pots in rural Malawian households in an area with high malaria prevalence: a randomized trial. Trop Med Int Health 8, 310315.

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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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