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Actual use of a front-of-pack nutrition logo in the supermarket: consumers’ motives in food choice

  • Ellis L Vyth (a1), Ingrid HM Steenhuis (a1), Jessica A Vlot (a1), Anouk Wulp (a1), Meefa G Hogenes (a1), Danielle H Looije (a1), Johannes Brug (a2) and Jacob C Seidell (a1) (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980010000637
  • Published online: 01 April 2010
Abstract
AbstractObjective

A front-of-pack nutrition logo on products with relatively favourable product compositions might help consumers to make more healthful choices. Studies investigating actual nutrition label use in point-of-purchase settings are scarce. The present study investigates the use of the ‘Choices’ nutrition logo in Dutch supermarkets.

Design

Adults were asked to complete a validated questionnaire about motivation for food choice and their purchased products were scored for the Choices logo after they had done their shopping.

Setting

Nine supermarkets in The Netherlands.

Subjects

A total of 404 respondents participated.

Results

Of the respondents, 62 % reported familiarity with the logo. The motivations for food choice that were positively associated with actually purchasing products with the logo were attention to ‘weight control’ and ‘product information’. The food choice motive ‘hedonism’ was negatively associated with purchasing products with the logo.

Conclusions

This is the first study to investigate actual use of the Choices logo. In order to stimulate consumers to purchase more products with a favourable product composition, extra attention should be paid to hedonistic aspects such as the tastefulness and the image of healthy products.

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*Corresponding author: Email ellis.vyth@falw.vu.nl
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