Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Assessment of a government-subsidized supermarket in a high-need area on household food availability and children’s dietary intakes

  • Brian Elbel (a1) (a2), Alyssa Moran (a3), L Beth Dixon (a3), Kamila Kiszko (a1), Jonathan Cantor (a2), Courtney Abrams (a1) and Tod Mijanovich (a2)...
Abstract
Objective

To assess the impact of a new government-subsidized supermarket in a high-need area on household food availability and dietary habits in children.

Design

A difference-in-difference study design was utilized.

Setting

Two neighbourhoods in the Bronx, New York City. Outcomes were collected in Morrisania, the target community where the new supermarket was opened, and Highbridge, the comparison community.

Subjects

Parents/caregivers of a child aged 3–10 years residing in Morrisania or Highbridge. Participants were recruited via street intercept at baseline (pre-supermarket opening) and at two follow-up periods (five weeks and one year post-supermarket opening).

Results

Analysis is based on 2172 street-intercept surveys and 363 dietary recalls from a sample of predominantly low-income minorities. While there were small, inconsistent changes over the time periods, there were no appreciable differences in availability of healthful or unhealthful foods at home, or in children’s dietary intake as a result of the supermarket.

Conclusions

The introduction of a government-subsidized supermarket into an underserved neighbourhood in the Bronx did not result in significant changes in household food availability or children’s dietary intake. Given the lack of healthful food options in underserved neighbourhoods and need for programmes that promote access, further research is needed to determine whether healthy food retail expansion, alone or with other strategies, can improve food choices of children and their families.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Assessment of a government-subsidized supermarket in a high-need area on household food availability and children’s dietary intakes
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Assessment of a government-subsidized supermarket in a high-need area on household food availability and children’s dietary intakes
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Assessment of a government-subsidized supermarket in a high-need area on household food availability and children’s dietary intakes
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
* Corresponding author: Email brian.elbel@nyumc.org
References
Hide All
1. Wang, Y & Beydoun, MA (2007) The obesity epidemic in the United States – gender, age, socioeconomic, racial/ethnic, and geographic characteristics: a systematic review and meta-regression analysis. Epidemiol Rev 29, 628.
2. Lovasi, GS, Utson, MA, Guerra, M et al. (2009) Built environments and obesity in disadvantaged populations. Epidemiol Rev 31, 720.
3. Larson, NI, Story, MI & Nelson, MC (2009) Neighborhood environments: disparities in access to healthy foods in the US. Am J Prev Med 36, 7481.
4. Moore, LV & Diez Roux, AV (2006) Associations of neighborhood characteristics with the location and type of food stores. Am J Public Health 96, 325331.
5. Morland, K, Wing, S, Diez Roux, A et al. (2002) Neighborhood characteristics associated with the location of food stores and food service places. Am J Prev Med 22, 2329.
6. Powell, LM, Slater, S, Mircheva, D et al. (2007) Food store availability and neighborhood characteristics in the United States. Prev Med 44, 189195.
7. Powell, LM, Auld, MC, Chaloupka, FJ et al. (2007) Associations between access to food stores and adolescent body mass index. Am J Prev Med 33, 4 Suppl., S301S307.
8. Morland, K, Diez Roux, AV & Wing, S (2006) Supermarkets, other food stores, and obesity: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study. Am J Prev Med 30, 333339.
9. Morland, K, Wing, S & Diez Roux, A (2002) The contextual effect of the local food environment on residents’ diets: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. Am J Public Health 92, 17611768.
10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2009) Recommended community strategies and measurements to prevent obesity in the United States. MMWR Recomm Rep 58, 126; available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtmlrr5807a1.htm
11. Institute of Medicine, Committee on Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention & Glickman, D (2012) Accelerating progress in obesity prevention: solving the weight of the nation. http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=13275&page=158 (accessed January 2014).
12. White House Task Force on Childhood Obesity (2010) Solving the Problem of Childhood Obesity within a Generation. http://www.letsmove.gov/white-house-task-force-childhood-obesity-report-president (accessed January 2014).
13. PolicyLink, The Food Trust & The Reinvestment Fund (2014) Healthy Food Access Portal. http://healthyfoodaccess.org/find-money/hffi/federal?destination=node/436 (accessed January 2014).
14. Cummins, S, Flint, E & Matthews, SA (2014) New neighborhood grocery store increased awareness of food access but did not alter dietary habits or obesity. Health Aff (Millwood) 33, 283291.
15. New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene (2012) Reversing the Epidemic: the New York City Obesity Task Force Plan to Prevent and Control Obesity. http://www.nyc.gov/html/om/pdf/2012/otf_report.pdf (accessed January 2014).
16. New York City (2013) Food Retail Expansion Program to Support Health. http://www.nyc.gov/html/misc/html/2009/fresh.shtml (accessed January 2014).
17. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (2013) County Health Rankings and Roadmaps. http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/ (accessed January 2014).
18. New York City Department of City Planning (2009) Bronx Community District 3. http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/html/neigh_info/bx03_info.shtml (accessed January 2014).
19. The Furman Center for Real Estate & Urban Policy (2011) BX03 Morrisania/Crotona. http://furmancenter.org/files/sotc/SOC2012_BX03.pdf (accessed January 2014).
20. New York City Department of City Planning (2009) Bronx Community District 4. http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/html/neigh_info/bx04_info.shtml (accessed January 2014).
21. The Furman Center for Real Estate & Urban Policy (2011) BX04 Highbridge/Concourse. http://furmancenter.org/research/sonychan (accessed January 2014).
22. AECOM (2010) Final Project Report: NYC full service grocery store analysis. http://www.nyc.gov/html/misc/pdf/nyc_store_analysis.pdf (accessed January 2014).
23. New York City Department of City Planning (2008) Going to Market: New York City’s Neighborhood Grocery Store and Supermarket Shortage. http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/html/supermarket/index.shtml (accessed January 2014).
24. Miller, KW, Wilder, LB, Stillman, FA et al. (1997) The feasibility of a street-intercept survey method in an African-American community. Am J Public Health 87, 655658.
25. Ompad, DC, Galea, S, Marshall, G et al. (2008) Sampling and recruitment in multilevel studies among marginalized urban populations: the IMPACT studies. J Urban Health 85, 268280.
26. Yoo, S, Baranowski, T, Missaghian, M et al. (2006) Food-purchasing patterns for home: a grocery store-intercept survey. Public Health Nutr 9, 384393.
27. Bodor, JN, Ulmer, VM, Dunaway, LF et al. (2010) The rationale behind small food store interventions in low-income urban neighborhoods: insights from New Orleans. J Nutr 140, 11851188.
28. Elbel, B, Kersh, R, Brescoll, VL et al. (2009) Calorie labeling and food choices: a first look at the effects on low-income people in New York City. Health Aff (Millwood) 28, w1110w1121.
29. Elbel, B, Gyamfi, J & Kersch, R (2011) Child and adolescent fast-food choice and the influence of calorie labeling: a natural experiment. Int J Obes (Lond) 35, 493500.
30. Hanson, NI, Neumark-Sztainer, D, Eisenberg, ME et al. (2005) Associations between parental report of the home food environment and adolescent intakes of fruits, vegetables and dairy foods. Public Health Nutr 8, 7785.
31. Bennett, CA, de Silva-Sanigorski, AM, Nichols, M et al. (2009) Assessing the intake of obesity-related foods and beverages in young children: comparison of a simple population survey with 24 hr-recall. Ing J Behav Nutr Phys Act 26, 71.
32. US Department of Agriculture (2012) National School Lunch Program Annual Participation. http://www.fns.usda.gov/pd/01slfypart.htm (accessed January 2014).
33. Skidmore, P, Welch, A, van Sluijs, E et al. (2010) Impact of a neighbourhood food environment on food consumption in children aged 9–10 years in the UK SPEEDY (Sport, Physical Activity and Eating behavior: Environmental Determinants in Young people) study. Public Health Nutr 13, 10221030.
34. Van Hulst, A, Barnett, TA, Gauvin, L et al. (2012) Associations between children’s diets and features of their residential and school neighbourhood food environments. Can J Public Health 103, 9 Suppl. 3, eS48eS54.
35. Timperio, A, Ball, K, Roberts, R et al. (2008) Children’s fruit and vegetable intake: associations with the neighbourhood food environment. Prev Med 46, 331335.
36. An, R & Sturm, R (2012) School and residential neighborhood food environment and dietary intake among California children and adolescents. Am J Prev Med 42, 129135.
37. Laska, MN, Hearst, MO, Forsyth, A et al. (2010) Neighbourhood food environments: are they associated with adolescent dietary intake, food purchases and weight status? Public Health Nutr 13, 17571763.
38. Zachary, DA, Palmer, AM, Beckham, SW et al. (2013) A framework for understanding grocery purchasing in a low-income urban environment. Qual Health Res 23, 665678.
39. Drewnowski, A & Darmon, N (2005) Food choices and diet costs: an economic analysis. J Nutr 135, 900904.
40. Drewnowski, A & Specter, SE (2004) Poverty and obesity: the role of energy density and energy costs. Am J Clin Nutr 79, 616.
41. Hawkes, C (2009) Sales promotions and food consumption. Nutr Rev 67, 333342.
42. Nestle, M (2006) What To Eat, 1st ed., pp. 521522. New York: North Point Press.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed