Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Consumption of foods by young children with diagnosed campylobacter infection – a pilot case–control study

  • Scott Cameron (a1) (a2), Karin Ried (a2), Anthony Worsley (a2) (a3) and David Topping (a4)
Abstract
AbstractObjective:

To determine whether parentally reported habitual intake of specific foods differed between children with diagnosed Campylobacter jejuni infection and children of a comparison group without diagnosed infection.

Design, setting and subjects:

Information was collected from the parents or primary caregivers of South Australian children aged 1–5 years with diagnosed C. jejuni (cases, n=172) and an age- and gender-matched group of uninfected children (controls, n=173). Frequency of consumption of 106 food and drink items was determined for the preceding two months by food-frequency questionnaire. Four children in the control group had recorded diarrhoeal episodes during the assessment period and were excluded, so 169 responses were evaluated for this group. Information was gathered on possible confounders including socio-economic status. Response frequencies were classified into three levels of consumption (rarely, weekly or daily) and statistical comparison was made by frequency of consumption of foods versus the ‘rarely’ classification for cases and controls, respectively.

Results:

Frequency of consumption of most foods, including starchy foods and fruits and vegetables, did not differ between cases and controls. However, reported consumption of eight food items (block and processed cheese (slices and spread), salami/fritz (a form of processed sausage), chicken nuggets, pasteurised milk, fish (canned or fresh) and hot French fries) was significantly higher by controls.

Conclusions:

The hypothesis that reported consumption of starchy foods was lower by cases than by controls was not supported by the data. However, consumption of some processed and unprocessed foods was higher by controls. Some of these foods have established bactericidal actions in vitro that may indicate a possible mechanism for this apparent protection.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Consumption of foods by young children with diagnosed campylobacter infection – a pilot case–control study
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Consumption of foods by young children with diagnosed campylobacter infection – a pilot case–control study
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Consumption of foods by young children with diagnosed campylobacter infection – a pilot case–control study
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email david.topping@csiro.au
References
Hide All
1 M Gracey . Nutritional effects and management of diarrhea in infancy. Acta Paediatrica (Supplement) 1999; 88: 110–2.

9 BS Ramakrishna , S Venkataraman , S Srinivasan , P Dash , GP Young , HJ Binder . Amylase-resistant starch plus oral rehydration solution for cholera. New England Journal of Medicine 2000; 342: 308–13.

10 GH Rabbani , T Teka , B Zaman , N Majid , M Khatun , GJ Fuchs . Clinical studies in persistent diarrhea: dietary management with green banana or pectin in Bangladeshi children. Gastroenterology 2001; 121: 554–60.

11 DJ Hampson , ID Robertson , T La , SL Oxberry , DW Pethick . Influences of diet and vaccination on colonisation of pigs by the intestinal spirochaete Brachyspira (Serpulina) pilosicoli. Veterinary Microbiology 2000; 73: 7584.

13 A Cassidy , SA Bingham , JH Cummings . Starch intake and colorectal cancer risk: an international comparison. British Journal of Cancer 1994; 69: 937–42.

14 DH Wilson , GJ Starr , AW Taylor , E Del Grande . Random digit dialling and Electronic White Pages samples compared: demographic profiles and health estimates. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health 1999; 23: 627–33.

21 HP Bachmann , U Spahr . The fate of potentially pathogenic bacteria in Swiss hard and semihard cheeses made from raw milk. Journal of Dairy Science 1995; 78: 476–83.

23 CN Kuratko , SA Becker . Dietary lipids alter fatty acid composition and PGE2 production in colonic lymphocytes. Nutrition and Cancer 1998; 31: 5661.

26 GW Gould . Methods for preservation and extension of shelf life. International Journal of Food Microbiology 1996; 33: 5164.

27 S Kashket , VJ Paolino , DA Lewis , J van Houte . In-vitro inhibition of glucosyltransferase from the dental plaque bacterium Streptococcus mutans by common beverages and food extracts. Archives of Oral Biology 1985; 30: 821–6.

29 J Vandenberghe , A Verheyen , S Lauwers , K Geboes . Spontaneous adenocarcinoma of the ascending colon in Wistar rats: the intracytoplasmic presence of a Campylobacter-like bacterium. Journal of Comparative Pathology 1985; 95: 4555.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 98 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 81 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 17th October 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.