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Eating in response to hunger and satiety signals is related to BMI in a nationwide sample of 1601 mid-age New Zealand women

  • Clara EL Madden (a1), Sook Ling Leong (a1), Andrew Gray (a2) and Caroline C Horwath (a1)
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To examine the association between eating in response to hunger and satiety signals (intuitive eating) and BMI. A second objective was to determine whether the hypothesized higher BMI in less intuitive eaters could be explained by the intake of specific foods, speed of eating or binge eating.

Design

Cross-sectional survey. Participants were randomly selected from a nationally representative sampling frame. Eating in response to hunger and satiety signals (termed ‘intuitive eating’), self-reported height and weight, frequency of binge eating, speed of eating and usual intakes of fruits, vegetables and selected high-fat and/or high-sugar foods were measured.

Setting

Nationwide study, New Zealand.

Subjects

Women (n 2500) aged 40–50 years randomly selected from New Zealand electoral rolls, including Māori rolls (66 % response rate; n 1601).

Results

Intuitive Eating Scale (IES) scores were significantly associated with BMI in an inverse direction, after adjusting for potential confounding variables. When controlling for confounding variables, as well as potential mediators, the inverse association between intuitive eating (potential range of IES score: 21–105) and BMI was only slightly attenuated and remained statistically significant (5·1 % decrease in BMI for every 10-unit increase in intuitive eating; 95 % CI 4·2, 6·1 %; P < 0·0 0 1). The relationship between intuitive eating and BMI was partially mediated by frequency of binge eating.

Conclusions

Eating in response to hunger and satiety signals is strongly associated with lower BMI in mid-age women. The direction of causality needs to be investigated in longitudinal studies and randomized controlled trials.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email caroline.matthaei@otago.ac.nz
Linked references
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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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