Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

‘Like me, want me, buy me, eat me’: relationship-building marketing communications in children’s magazines

  • Sandra C Jones (a1), Nadia Mannino (a1) and Julia Green (a1)
Abstract
AbstractObjective

Television, Internet and print media are saturated with advertisements for unhealthy food that use marketing tactics aimed to build long-term brand loyalty and ‘relationships’ with children. While research in this area has largely focused on television, the current study examines children’s responses to relationship-building marketing communications found in popular children’s magazines.

Design

A qualitative study consisting of friendship-pair interviews in which children were interviewed and asked to comment on a range of recent food advertisements.

Setting

A university-based after-school care programme in New South Wales, Australia.

Subjects

Ten children aged 6–13 years, interviewed in self-selected friendship pairs.

Results

The children reported being attracted to the advertisements because of specific elements of the marketing strategies utilised. Some children were able to recognise the persuasive intent of the media, whereas others did not even identify the pages as advertisements.

Conclusions

It was clear from the children’s responses that these types of relationship-building marketing communications influence children’s attitudes towards branded food products and their views on the nutritional value and social meanings of food.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      ‘Like me, want me, buy me, eat me’: relationship-building marketing communications in children’s magazines
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      ‘Like me, want me, buy me, eat me’: relationship-building marketing communications in children’s magazines
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      ‘Like me, want me, buy me, eat me’: relationship-building marketing communications in children’s magazines
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email sandraj@uow.edu.au
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 28
Total number of PDF views: 116 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 249 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 29th April 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.