Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Low-income consumers' attitudes and behaviour towards access, availability and motivation to eat fruit and vegetables

  • LA Dibsdall (a1), N Lambert (a1), RF Bobbin (a1) and LJ Frewer (a1)
Abstract
AbstractObjective:

To determine low-income consumers' attitudes and behaviour towards fruit and vegetables, in particular issues of access to, affordability of and motivation to eat fruit and vegetables.

Design and setting:

Questionnaire survey mailed to homes owned by a large UK housing association.

Participants:

Participants were 680 low-income men and women, aged 17–100 years.

Results:

Age, employment, gender, smoking and marital status all affected attitudes towards access, affordability and motivation to eat fruit and vegetables. Few (7%) participants experienced difficulty in visiting a supermarket at least once a week, despite nearly half having no access to a car for shopping. Fruit and vegetables were affordable to this low-income group in the amounts they habitually bought; purchasing additional fruits and vegetables was seen as prohibitively expensive. Less than 5% felt they had a problem with eating healthily and yet only 18% claimed to eat the recommended 5 or more portions of fruit and vegetables every day.

Conclusions:

Supported by research, current UK Government policy is driven by the belief that low-income groups have difficulties in access to and affordability of fruit and vegetables. Findings from this particular group suggest that, of the three potential barriers, access and affordability were only a small part of the ‘problem’ surrounding low fruit and vegetable consumption. Thus, other possible determinants of greater consequence need to be identified. We suggest focusing attention on motivation to eat fruit and vegetables, since no dietary improvement can be achieved if people do not recognise there is a problem.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Low-income consumers' attitudes and behaviour towards access, availability and motivation to eat fruit and vegetables
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Low-income consumers' attitudes and behaviour towards access, availability and motivation to eat fruit and vegetables
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Low-income consumers' attitudes and behaviour towards access, availability and motivation to eat fruit and vegetables
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email Louise.Dibsdall@bbsrc.ac.uk
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

4JH Cummings , SA Bingham . Diet and the prevention of cancer. Br. Med. J. 1998; 317: 1636–40.

9H Billson , JA Pryer , R Nichols . Variation in fruit and vegetable consumption among adults in Britain. An analysis from the dietary and nutritional survey of British adults. Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 1999; 53: 946–52.

15J Brug , L Lechner , H De Vries . Psychosocial determinants of fruit and vegetable consumption. Appetite 1995; 25: 285–96.

21LA Kennedy , C Hunt , P Hodgson . Nutrition education program based on EFNEP for low-income women in the United Kingdom: ‘Friends with Food’. J. Nutr. Educ. 1998; 30: 8999.

24LA Dibsdall , N Lambert , LJ Frewer . Using interpretative phenomenology to understand the experiences of a low-income group of UK women towards aspects of food choice and health. J. Nutr. Educ. 2002; 34: 298309.

25N Lambert , LA Dibsdall , LJ Frewer . Poor diet and smoking: the big killers. Comparing health education in two hazard domains. Br. Food J. 2002; 104: 6375.

27K Glanz , M Basil , E Maibach , J Goldberg , D Snyder . Why Americans eat what they do: taste, nutrition, cost, convenience, and weight control concerns as influences on food consumption. J. Am. Diet. Assoc. 1998; 98: 1118–26.

28H Aarts , B Verplanken , A Van Knippenberg . Predicting behaviour from actions in the past: repeated decision making or a matter of habit? J. Appl. Soc. Psych. 1998; 28: 1355–74.

29R Povey , M Conner , P Sparks , R James , R Shepherd . Interpretations of healthy and unhealthy eating, and implications for dietary change. Health Educ. Res. 1998; 13: 171–83.

30MM Bergadaà . The role of time in the action of the consumer. J. Consumer Res. 1990; 17: 289302.

31CJ Lennings . Optimism, satisfaction and time perspective in the elderly. Int. J. Aging Hum. Dev. 2000; 51: 167–81.

33MG Marmot . Improvement of social environment to improve health. Lancet 1998; 351: 5760.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords: