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Self-reported dietary intake and appetite predict early treatment outcome among low-BMI adults initiating HIV treatment in sub-Saharan Africa

  • John R Koethe (a1) (a2), Meridith Blevins (a3) (a4), Claire Bosire (a5) (a6), Christopher Nyirenda (a1) (a7), Edmond K Kabagambe (a5), Albert Mwango (a3) (a8), Webster Kasongo (a3) (a9), Isaac Zulu (a1) (a7), Bryan E Shepherd (a4) and Douglas C Heimburger (a1) (a3) (a6)...
Abstract
AbstractObjective

Low BMI is a major risk factor for early mortality among HIV-infected persons starting antiretrovial therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa and the common patient belief that antiretroviral medications produce distressing levels of hunger is a barrier to treatment adherence. We assessed relationships between appetite, dietary intake and treatment outcome 12 weeks after ART initiation among HIV-infected adults with advanced malnutrition and immunosuppression.

Design

A prospective, observational cohort study. Dietary intake was assessed using a 24 h recall survey. The relationships of appetite, intake and treatment outcome were analysed using time-varying Cox models.

Setting

A public-sector HIV clinic in Lusaka, Zambia.

Subjects

One hundred and forty-two HIV-infected adults starting ART with BMI <16 kg/m2 and/or CD4+ lymphocyte count <50 cells/μl.

Results

Median age, BMI and CD4+ lymphocyte count were 32 years, 16 kg/m2 and 34 cells/μl, respectively. Twenty-five participants (18 %) died before 12 weeks and another thirty-three (23 %) were lost to care. A 500 kJ/d higher energy intake at any time after ART initiation was associated with an approximate 16 % reduction in the hazard of death (adjusted hazard ratio = 0·84; P = 0·01), but the relative contribution of carbohydrate, protein or fat to total energy was not a significant predictor of outcome. Appetite normalized gradually among survivors and hunger was rarely reported.

Conclusions

Poor early ART outcomes were strikingly high in a cohort of HIV-infected adults with advanced malnutrition and mortality was predicted by lower dietary intake. Intervention trials to promote post-ART intake in this population may benefit survival and are warranted.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email john.r.koethe@vanderbilt.edu
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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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