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Validation of nutrient intake using an FFQ and repeated 24 h recalls in black and white subjects of the Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2)

Abstract
AbstractObjective

To validate a 204-item quantitative FFQ for measurement of nutrient intake in the Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2).

Design

Calibration study participants were randomly selected from the AHS-2 cohort by church, and then subject-within-church. Each participant provided two sets of three weighted 24 h dietary recalls and a 204-item FFQ. Race-specific correlation coefficients (r), corrected for attenuation from within-person variation in the recalls, were calculated for selected energy-adjusted macro- and micronutrients.

Setting

Adult members of the AHS-2 cohort geographically spread throughout the USA and Canada.

Subjects

Calibration study participants included 461 blacks of American and Caribbean origin and 550 whites.

Results

Calibration study subjects represented the total cohort very well with respect to demographic variables. Approximately 33 % were males. Whites were older, had higher education and lower BMI compared with blacks. Across fifty-one variables, average deattenuated energy-adjusted validity correlations were 0·60 in whites and 0·52 in blacks. Individual components of protein had validity ranging from 0·40 to 0·68 in blacks and from 0·63 to 0·85 in whites; for total fat and fatty acids, validity ranged from 0·43 to 0·75 in blacks and from 0·46 to 0·77 in whites. Of the eighteen micronutrients assessed, sixteen in blacks and sixteen in whites had deattenuated energy-adjusted correlations ≥0·4, averaging 0·60 and 0·53 in whites and blacks, respectively.

Conclusions

With few exceptions validity coefficients were moderate to high for macronutrients, fatty acids, vitamins, minerals and fibre. We expect to successfully use these data for measurement error correction in analyses of diet and disease risk.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email kjaceldo@llu.edu
Linked references
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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

3.W Willett (1998) Correction for the effects of measurement error. In Nutritional Epidemiology, 2nd ed., pp. 302320 [W Willett, editor]. New York: Oxford University Press.

8.W Willett (1998) Food frequency methods. In Nutritional Epidemiology, 2nd ed., pp. 74100 [W Willett, editor]. New York: Oxford University Press.

9.W Willett & M Stampfer (1998) Implications of total energy intake for epidemiologic analysis. In Nutritional Epidemiology, 2nd ed., pp. 273301 [W Willett, editor]. New York: Oxford University Press.

10.B Efron & RJ Tibshirani (1993) Better bootstrap intervals. In An Introduction to the Bootstrap, pp. 184188. New York: Chapman and Hall.

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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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