Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Worldwide prevalence of anaemia, WHO Vitamin and Mineral Nutrition Information System, 1993–2005

  • Erin McLean (a1), Mary Cogswell (a2), Ines Egli (a3), Daniel Wojdyla (a4) and Bruno de Benoist (a1)...
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To provide current global and regional estimates of anaemia prevalence and number of persons affected in the total population and by population subgroup.

Setting and design

We used anaemia prevalence data from the WHO Vitamin and Mineral Nutrition Information System for 1993–2005 to generate anaemia prevalence estimates for countries with data representative at the national level or at the first administrative level that is below the national level. For countries without eligible data, we employed regression-based estimates, which used the UN Human Development Index (HDI) and other health indicators. We combined country estimates, weighted by their population, to estimate anaemia prevalence at the global level, by UN Regions and by category of human development.

Results

Survey data covered 48·8 % of the global population, 76·1 % of preschool-aged children, 69·0 % of pregnant women and 73·5 % of non-pregnant women. The estimated global anaemia prevalence is 24·8 % (95 % CI 22·9, 26·7 %), affecting 1·62 billion people (95 % CI 1·50, 1·74 billion). Estimated anaemia prevalence is 47·4 % (95 % CI 45·7, 49·1 %) in preschool-aged children, 41·8 % (95 % CI 39·9, 43·8 %) in pregnant women and 30·2 % (95 % CI 28·7, 31·6 %) in non-pregnant women. In numbers, 293 million (95 % CI 282, 303 million) preschool-aged children, 56 million (95 % CI 54, 59 million) pregnant women and 468 million (95 % CI 446, 491 million) non-pregnant women are affected.

Conclusion

Anaemia affects one-quarter of the world’s population and is concentrated in preschool-aged children and women, making it a global public health problem. Data on relative contributions of causal factors are lacking, however, which makes it difficult to effectively address the problem.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Worldwide prevalence of anaemia, WHO Vitamin and Mineral Nutrition Information System, 1993–2005
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Worldwide prevalence of anaemia, WHO Vitamin and Mineral Nutrition Information System, 1993–2005
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Worldwide prevalence of anaemia, WHO Vitamin and Mineral Nutrition Information System, 1993–2005
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email debenoistb@who.int
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

7.O Koller (1982) The clinical significance of hemodilution during pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol Surv 37, 649652.

8.D Nordenberg , R Yip & NJ Binkin (1990) The effect of cigarette smoking on hemoglobin levels and anemia screening. JAMA 264, 15561559.

9.A Hurtado , C Merino & E Delgado (1945) Influence of anoxemia on haematopoietic activities. Arch Intern Med 75, 284323.

15.CD Mathers & D Loncar (2006) Projections of global mortality and burden of disease from 2002 to 2030. PLoS Med 3, e442.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords: