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    Andersson, Maria and Hurrell, Richard F. 2010. Prévention de la carence en fer chez le nourrisson, l’enfant et l’adolescent. Annales Nestlé (Ed. française), Vol. 68, Issue. 3, p. 124.


    Andersson, Maria and Hurrell, Richard F. 2010. Prevención de la carencia de hierro en la lactancia, la infancia y la adolescencia. Annales Nestlé (Ed. española), Vol. 68, Issue. 3, p. 121.


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Evaluation of the effectiveness of stainless steel cooking pots in reducing iron-deficiency anaemia in food aid-dependent populations

  • Leisel Talley (a1), Bradley A Woodruff (a2), Andrew Seal (a3), Kathryn Tripp (a4), Laurent Sadikiel Mselle (a5), Fathia Abdalla (a6), Rita Bhatia (a7) and Zhara Mirghani (a8)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980009005254
  • Published online: 01 April 2009
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To evaluate the effectiveness of stainless steel (Fe alloy) cooking pots in reducing Fe-deficiency anaemia in food aid-dependent populations.

Design

Repeated cross-sectional surveys. Between December 2001 and January 2003, three surveys among children aged 6–59 months and their mothers were conducted in 110 households randomly selected from each camp. The primary outcomes were changes in Hb concentration and Fe status.

Setting

Two long-term refugee camps in western Tanzania.

Subjects

Children (6–59 months) and their mothers were surveyed at 0, 6 and 12 months post-intervention. Stainless steel pots were distributed to all households in Nduta camp (intervention); households in Mtendeli camp (control) continued to cook with aluminium or clay pots.

Results

Among children, there was no change in Hb concentration at 1 year; however, Fe status was lower in the intervention camp than the control camp (serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) concentration: 6·8 v. 5·9 μg/ml; P < 0·001). There was no change in Hb concentration among non-pregnant mothers at 1 year. Subjects in the intervention camp had lower Fe status than those in the control camp (sTfR concentration: 5·8 v. 4·7 μg/ml; P = 0·003).

Conclusions

Distribution of stainless steel pots did not increase Hb concentration or improve Fe status in children or their mothers. The use of stainless steel prevents rusting but may not provide sufficient amounts of Fe and strong educational campaigns may be required to maximize use. The distribution of stainless steel pots in refugee contexts is not recommended as a strategy to control Fe deficiency.

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*Corresponding author: Email Ltalley@cdc.gov
Linked references
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6.A Tomkins & CJ Henry (1992) Comparison of nutrient composition of refugee rations and pet foods. Lancet 340, 367368.

7.Z Weise Prinzo & B De Benoist (2002) Meeting the challenges of micronutrient deficiencies in emergency-affected populations. Proc Nutr Soc 61, 251257.

8.AA Adish , SA Esrey , TW Gyorkos , J Jean-Baptiste & A Rojhani (1999) Effect of consumption of food cooked in iron pots on iron status and growth of young children: a randomised trial. Lancet 353, 712716.

15.AR Cohen & J Seidl-Friedman (1988) HemoCue system for hemoglobin measurement. Evaluation in anemic and nonanemic children. Am J Clin Pathol 90, 302305.

21.BD Schneider & EA Leibold (2000) Regulation of mammalian iron homeostasis. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 3, 267274.

24.T Bothwell (1995) Overview and mechanisms of iron regulation. Nutr Rev 53, 237245.

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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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