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Feedback in web-based questionnaires as incentive to increase compliance in studies on lifestyle factors

  • Olle Bälter (a1), Elinor Fondell (a2) (a3) and Katarina Bälter (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980011003041
  • Published online: 29 November 2011
Abstract
AbstractObjective

We explored the use of feedback in interactive web-based questionnaires for collecting data on lifestyle factors in epidemiological studies.

Design

Here we report from a cohort study on lifestyle factors and upper respiratory tract infections among 1805 men and women. We introduced interactivity in the form of personalized feedback and feedback on a group level regarding dietary intake, physical activity and incidence of infections in web-based questionnaires as incentives for the respondents to continue answering questions and stay in the study.

Setting

The study was performed in Sweden.

Subjects

All participants were randomly selected from the population registry.

Results

Personalized feedback was offered in the baseline questionnaire and feedback on a group level in the five follow-up questionnaires. In total, 88 % of the participants actively chose to get personalized feedback at least once in the baseline questionnaire. The follow-up questionnaires were sent by email and the overall compliance at each follow-up was 83–84 %, despite only one reminder. In total, 74 % completed all five follow-ups. However, the compliance was higher among those who chose feedback in the baseline questionnaire compared with those who did not choose feedback.

Conclusions

The results show that it is possible to use feedback in web questionnaires and that it has the potential to increase compliance. The majority of the participants actively chose to take part in the personalized feedback in the baseline questionnaire and future research should focus on improving the design of the feedback, which may ultimately result in even higher compliance in research studies.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email katarina.balter@ki.se
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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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