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Fresh market to supermarket: nutrition transition insights from Chiang Mai, Thailand

  • Bronwyn Alison Isaacs (a1), Jane Dixon (a2) and Cathy Banwell (a2)
Abstract
Objective

A preliminary investigation into different eating patterns among Thai consumers who shop at fresh markets as opposed to supermarkets in Chiang Mai.

Design

A short questionnaire adopted from a previous study was administered to the forty-four participants, who comprised supermarket users, fresh market users and people who consistently shopped at both supermarkets and fresh markets.

Setting

Participants were recruited within four fresh markets and two food courts attached to supermarkets in Chiang Mai.

Subjects

Chiang Mai residents who agreed to participate in the study. Equal numbers were regular fresh market and supermarket users.

Results

Initial results suggest an association between shopping at supermarkets and attributing bread with culinary value.

Conclusions

Supermarkets may be potentially significant players in the ‘nutrition transition’, providing Thais more convenient shopping at some cost to their healthy food choices.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email bronwyn.isaacs@gmail.com
References
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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
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