Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa
  • Access
  • Cited by 24
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Ford, Patricia A. Jaceldo-Siegl, Karen Lee, Jerry W. and Tonstad, Serena 2016. Trans fatty acid intake is related to emotional affect in the Adventist Health Study-2. Nutrition Research, Vol. 36, Issue. 6, p. 509.


    Kingsbury, Mila Dupuis, Gabrielle Jacka, Felice Roy-Gagnon, Marie-Hélène McMartin, Seanna E and Colman, Ian 2016. Associations between fruit and vegetable consumption and depressive symptoms: evidence from a national Canadian longitudinal survey. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, Vol. 70, Issue. 2, p. 155.


    Milte, Catherine M. and McNaughton, Sarah A. 2016. Dietary patterns and successful ageing: a systematic review. European Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 55, Issue. 2, p. 423.


    Giné-Garriga, Maria Vidal-Garcia, Eulàlia Gómara-Toldrà, Natàlia Roman-Viñas, Blanca and Roqué-Fíguls, Marta 2015. Combined Effects of Diet and Exercise or Diet Alone to Improve Physical Function in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Systematic Review of the Literature. Current Nutrition Reports, Vol. 4, Issue. 2, p. 164.


    Gong, Qian-fen Tu, Ling Zhou, Liang and Chen, Hong 2015. Associations between Dietary Factors and Self-Reported Physical Health in Chinese Scientific Workers. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol. 12, Issue. 12, p. 16060.


    Henríquez-Sánchez, Patricia Doreste-Alonso, Jorge Ruano, Cristina Serra-Majem, Lluís Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel and Sánchez-Villegas, Almudena 2015. The Mediterranean Diet.


    Woodside, Jayne V. McGrath, Alanna J. Lyner, Natalie and McKinley, Michelle C. 2015. Carotenoids and health in older people. Maturitas, Vol. 80, Issue. 1, p. 63.


    Kolbe-Alexander, Tracy Greyling, Michael da Silva, Roseanne Milner, Karen Patel, Deepak Wyper, Lauren Beckowski, Meghan Lambert, Estelle V. and Goetzel, Ron 2014. The Relationship Between Workplace Environment and Employee Health Behaviors in a South African Workforce. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 56, Issue. 10, p. 1094.


    Stranges, S. Samaraweera, P. C. Taggart, F. Kandala, N.-B. and Stewart-Brown, S. 2014. Major health-related behaviours and mental well-being in the general population: the Health Survey for England. BMJ Open, Vol. 4, Issue. 9, p. e005878.


    Ford, Patricia A. Jaceldo-Siegl, Karen Lee, Jerry W. Youngberg, Wes and Tonstad, Serena 2013. Intake of Mediterranean foods associated with positive affect and low negative affect. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, Vol. 74, Issue. 2, p. 142.


    Liau, Siow Yen Shafie, Asrul A Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Othman, Ahmad Tajuddin Mohamed, Mohamad Haniki Nik and Hamdi, Menal A 2013. Stages of change and health-related quality of life among employees of an institution. Health Expectations, Vol. 16, Issue. 2, p. 199.


    Neville, Charlotte E. Young, Ian S. Gilchrist, Sarah E. C. M. McKinley, Michelle C. Gibson, Andrew Edgar, J. David and Woodside, Jayne V. 2013. Effect of increased fruit and vegetable consumption on physical function and muscle strength in older adults. AGE, Vol. 35, Issue. 6, p. 2409.


    Takaoka, Yuriko and Kawakami, Norito 2013. Fruit and vegetable consumption in adolescence and health in early adulthood: a longitudinal analysis of the Statistics Canada’s National Population Health Survey. BMC Public Health, Vol. 13, Issue. 1,


    Henríquez Sánchez, P Ruano, C de Irala, J Ruiz-Canela, M Martínez-González, M A and Sánchez-Villegas, A 2012. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet and quality of life in the SUN Project. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 66, Issue. 3, p. 360.


    Neville, C. E. Young, I. S. Gilchrist, S. E. C. M. McKinley, M. C. Gibson, A. Banerjee, T. Edgar, J. D. and Woodside, J. V. 2012. The effect of fruit and vegetable consumption on physical function and muscle strength in older adults: the Ageing and Dietary Intervention Trial (ADIT). Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, Vol. 71, Issue. OCE2,


    Pérez-Cueto, Federico JA Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica Shankar, Bhavani Brambila-Macias, José Bech-Larsen, Tino Mazzocchi, Mario Capacci, Sara Saba, Anna Turrini, Aida Niedzwiedzka, Barbara Piorecka, Beata Kozioł-Kozakowska, Agniezska Wills, Josephine Traill, W Bruce and Verbeke, Wim 2012. Assessment of evaluations made to healthy eating policies in Europe: a review within the EATWELL Project. Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 15, Issue. 08, p. 1489.


    Hamer, M McNaughton, S A Bates, C J and Mishra, G D 2010. Dietary patterns, assessed from a weighed food record, and survival among elderly participants from the United Kingdom. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 64, Issue. 8, p. 853.


    Myint, Phyo K. Smith, Richard D. Luben, Robert N. Surtees, Paul G. Wainwright, Nicholas W.J. Wareham, Nicholas J. Bingham, Sheila A. and Khaw, Kay-Tee 2010. The Short-Form Six-Dimension utility index predicted mortality in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer-Norfolk prospective population-based study. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 63, Issue. 2, p. 192.


    Benzie, Iris F.F. and Wachtel‐Galor, Sissi 2009. Advances in Clinical Chemistry Volume 47.


    Croker, H. Whitaker, K.L. Cooke, L. and Wardle, J. 2009. Do social norms affect intended food choice?. Preventive Medicine, Vol. 49, Issue. 2-3, p. 190.


    ×

Fruit and vegetable consumption and self-reported functional health in men and women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer–Norfolk (EPIC–Norfolk): a population-based cross-sectional study

Abstract
AbstractObjectives

To investigate the association between fruit and vegetable consumption and self-reported physical and mental functional health measured by an anglicised short-form 36-item questionnaire (UK SF-36).

Design

Population-based cross-sectional study.

Setting

General community in Norfolk, UK.

Subjects

A total of 16 792 men and women aged 40–79 years recruited from general practice population registers as part of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)–Norfolk study, who completed food-frequency questionnaires in 1993–1997 and Health and Life Experiences Questionnaires 18 months later, were enrolled in the study.

Results

Mean SF-36 physical component summary scores increased significantly with increasing total fruit and vegetable consumption in both men and women (P <  0.0001 for trend). Men and women in the top quartile of consumption compared with the bottom quartile had a significantly higher likelihood of reporting good physical health (defined as a score ≥ 55); odds ratio (OR) 1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11–1.53 for men and OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.11–1.48 for women, after controlling for age, body mass index, smoking, education, social class, prevalent illness and total energy intake. Exclusion of current smokers and people with prevalent illness did not alter the associations.

Conclusion

Higher fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with better self-reported physical functional health within a general population. Increasing daily intake by two portions of fruit and vegetables was associated with an 11% higher likelihood of good functional health. Since the current average consumption of fruit and vegetables in the UK is about three portions, the recommended ‘five a day’ strategy may have additional benefit for functional as well as other health outcomes in the population.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Fruit and vegetable consumption and self-reported functional health in men and women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer–Norfolk (EPIC–Norfolk): a population-based cross-sectional study
      Your Kindle email address
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Fruit and vegetable consumption and self-reported functional health in men and women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer–Norfolk (EPIC–Norfolk): a population-based cross-sectional study
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Fruit and vegetable consumption and self-reported functional health in men and women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer–Norfolk (EPIC–Norfolk): a population-based cross-sectional study
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email Pkyawmyint@aol.com
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

1N Eikenberry , C Smith . Healthful eating: perceptions, motivations, barriers, and promoters in low-income minnesota communities. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2004; 104: 1158–61

4JH John , S Ziebland , P Yudkin , LS Roe , HA Neil . Oxford Fruit and Vegetable Study Group. Effects of fruits and vegetable consumption on plasma antioxidant concentrations and blood pressure: a randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2002; 359: 1969–74

5KJ Joshipura , FB Hu , JE Manson , MJ Stampfer , EB Rimm , FE Speizer , . The effect of fruit and vegetable intake on risk for coronary heart disease. Annals of Internal Medicine 2001; 134: 1106–14

6K Miura , P Greenland , J Stamler , K Liu , ML Daviglus , H Nakagawa . Relation of vegetable, fruit, and meat intake to 7-year blood pressure changes in middle-aged men: the Chicago Western Electric Study. American Journal of Epidemiology 2004; 159: 572–80

9SA Bingham , NE Day , R Luben , P Ferrari , N Slimani , T Norat , . Dietary fibre in food and protection against colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC): an observational study. Lancet 2003; 361: 1496–501

11KB Michels , E Giovannucci , E Chan , AT Chan , R Singhania , CS Fuchs , . Fruit and vegetable consumption and colorectal adenomas in the Nurses' Health Study. Cancer Research 2006; 66: 3942–53

12TJ Key , N Allen , P Appleby , K Overvad , A Tjonneland , A Miller , . Fruits and vegetables and prostate cancer: no association among 1104 cases in a prospective study of 130544 men in the Eurpoean Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. International Journal of Cancer 2004; 109: 119–24

13HC Hung , A Merchant , W Willett , A Ascherio , BA Rosner , E Rimm , . The association between fruit and vegetable consumption and peripheral arterial disease. Epidemiology 2003; 14: 659–65

14KT Khaw , S Bingham , A Welch , R Luben , N Wareham , S Oakes , . Relation between plasma ascorbic acid and mortality in men and women in EPIC-Norfolk prospective study: a prospective population study. European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Lancet 2001; 357: 657–63

16J Gundgaard , JN Nielsen , J Olsen , J Sorensen . Increased intake of fruit and vegetables: estimation of impact in terms of life expectancy and healthcare costs. Public Health Nutrition 2003; 6: 2530

17M Tobias , M Turley , N Stefanogiannis , S Vander Hoorn , C Lawes , CN Mhurchu , Vegetable and fruit intake and mortality from chronic disease in New Zealand. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health 2006; 30: 2631

19AA Welch , R Luben , KT Khaw , SA Bingham . The CAFE computer program for nutritional analysis of the EPIC-Norfolk food frequency questionnaire and identification of extreme nutrient values. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetetics 2005; 18: 99116

20JE Brazier , R Harper , NMB Jones , A O'Caithain , KJ Thomas , T Usherwood , . Validating the SF-36 health survey questionnaire – new outcome measure for primary care. British Medical Journal 1992; 305: 160–4

21PG Surtees , NW Wainwright , KT Khaw . Obesity, confidant support and functional health: cross-sectional evidence from the EPIC-Norfolk cohort. International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders 2004; 28: 748–58

25P Elias , K Halstead , K Prandy . CASOC: Computer-Assisted Standard Occupational Coding. HMSO: London1993

26C Taft , J Karlsson , M Sullivan . Do SF-36 summary component scores accurately summarize subscale scores? Quality of Life Research 2001; 10: 395404

27JE Ware , M Kosinski . Interpreting SF-36 summary health measures: a response. Quality of Life Research 2001; 10: 405–13415–20

28S Shohaimi , A Welch , S Bingham , R Luben , N Day , N Wareham , . Residential area deprivation predicts fruit and vegetable consumption independently of individual educational level and occupational social class: a cross sectional population study in the Norfolk cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC-Norfolk). Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 2004; 58: 686–91

30AH Baker , J Wardle . Sex differences in fruit and vegetable intake in older adults. Appetite 2003; 40: 269–75

31NE Day , N McKeown , MY Wong , A Welch , S Bingham . Epidemiological assesssment of diet: a comparison of a 7-day diary with a food frequency questionnaire using urinary markers of nitrogen, potassium and sodium. International Journal of Epidemiology 2001; 30: 309–17

33SA Bingham , R Luben , A Welch , N Wareham , KT Khaw , N Day . Are imprecise methods obscuring a relation between fat and breast cancer? Lancet 2003; 362: 212–4

34CL Parr , MB Veierod , P Laake , E Lund , A Hjartaker . Test–retest reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and estimated effects on disease risk in the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study (NOWAC). Nutrition Journal 2006; 5: 4

35A Steptoe , L Perkins-Porras , S Hilton , E Rink , FP Cappuccio . Quality of life and self-rated health in relation to changes in fruit and vegetable intake and in plasma vitamins C and E in a randomised trial of behavioural and nutritional education counselling. British Journal of Nutrition 2004; 92: 177–84

37CR Felippe , PC Calder , MG Vecchia , MR Campos , J Mancini-Filho , EA Newsholme , . Fatty acid composition of lymphocytes and macrophages from rats fed fibre-rich diet: a comparison between oat bran and wheat bran enriched diets. Lipids 1997; 32: 587–91

38M Chandalia , A Greg , D Lutjohann , K von Bergmann , SM Grundy , LJ Brinkley . Beneficial effect of high dietary fibre intake in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. New England Journal of Medicine 2000; 342: 1392–8

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords: