Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Growth pattern and prevalence of obesity in affluent schoolchildren of Delhi

  • A Sharma (a1), K Sharma (a1) and KP Mathur (a1)

Abstract

Objective

To investigate the prevalence of obesity in affluent schoolchildren of Delhi.

Design

This was a cross-sectional study covering over 4000 students. Anthropometric measurements and birth weights of all the students were recorded.

Setting and subjects

The study was carried out in a school catering to the affluent section of Indian society and included both boys and girls in the age range 4 to 17 years.

Results

The heights and weights of the children were almost similar to those of the National Center for Health Statistics standards, and were much above the values reported by the Indian National Nutrition Monitoring Bureau, which largely captures rural children belonging to lower socio-economic strata in India. Of the subjects studied, 22% were overweight and 6% were obese. Only 6% of these children had low birth weight.

Conclusion

The prevalence of obesity is rising among children because of their change in lifestyle. Children born with a birth weight of ≥ 3 kg tended to have higher body mass index in their adolescent years and maybe consequently in their adult years. Nutrition education can play an important part in reducing the incidence of overweight/obesity and its associated complications.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Growth pattern and prevalence of obesity in affluent schoolchildren of Delhi
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Growth pattern and prevalence of obesity in affluent schoolchildren of Delhi
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Growth pattern and prevalence of obesity in affluent schoolchildren of Delhi
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

References

Hide All
1World Health Organization (WHO). Obesity: Preventing and Managing the Global Epidemic. Report of a WHO Consultation. WHO Technical Report Series No. 894. Geneva: WHO, 2000.
2Shetty, P. Secular trends in obesity and physical activity: physiological and public health considerations. In: Shetty, P, Gopalan, C, eds. Diet, Nutrition and Chronic Disease – An Asian Perspective. London: Smith Gordon Publishers, 1998; 89 pp.
3Gopinath, N, Chadha, SL, Jain, P, Shekhawat, S, Tandon, R. An epidemiological study of obesity in adults in urban population of Delhi. Journal of Association of Physicians of India 1994; 42: 212–5.
4Trayhurn P. The biology of obesity – recent developments in the regulation of energy balance. In: Seshadri M, Siddhu A, eds. Nutrition Goals for Asia – Vision 2020. Proceedings of the 9th Asian Congress of Nutrition, New Delhi, India, 23–27 February 2003. New Delhi: Nutrition Foundation of India, 2003; 443–7.
5Krishnaswamy, K, ed. Obesity in the Urban Middle Class in Delhi. Scientific Report No. 15. New Delhi: Nutrition Foundation of India, 1999.
6Misra, A, Pandey, RM, Devi, JR, Sharma, R, Vikram, NK, Khanna, N. High prevalence of diabetes, obesity and dyslipidaemia in urban slum population in northern India. International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders 2001; 25: 1722–9.
7Berenson, GS, Srinivasan, SR, Bao, W, Newman, WP, Tracy, RE, Wattigney, WA. Association between multiple cardiovascular risk factors and atherosclerosis in children and young adults. The Bogalusa Heart Study. New England Journal of Medicine 1998; 338: 1650–6.
8Health implications of obesity. NIH Consensus Statement Online 1985 Feb 11–13; 5(9): 1–7. Available athttp://consensus.nih.gov/1985/1985Obesity049html.htm . Accessed 21 December 2004..
9Agarwal, KN, Agarwal, DK. Growth – Infancy to Adolescence. New Delhi: CBS Publishers and Distributors, 2003.
10Booth, ML, Wake, M, Armstrong, T, Chey, T, Hesketh, K, Mathur, S. The epidemiology of overweight and obesity among Australian children and adolescents, 1995–97. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health 2001; 25: 162–9.
11Torgan C. Childhood obesity on the rise. The NIH Word on Health [online], June 2002. Available athttp://www.nih.gov/news/WordonHealth/jun2002/childhoodobesity.htm . Accessed 2 November 2004..
12Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, US Department of Agriculture. Childhood Obesity: Causes & Prevention. Symposium Proceedings [online], October 1998. Available athttp://www.usda.gov/cnpp/Seminars/obesity.PDF#search = %22Childhood%20obesity%3A%20Causes%20%26%20Prevention.%20Symposium%20Proceedings%2C%20October%201998%2C%20USDA%22 . Accessed 30 March 2005..
13Sharma BK. Obesity in childhood can lead to diabetes. The Tribune, 21 April 2002.
14Jelliffe, DB, Jelliffe, EFP, Zerfas, A, Neumann, CG. Community Nutritional Assessment with Special Reference to Less Technically Developed Countries. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989.
15World Health Organization (WHO). Measuring Change in Nutritional Status. Guidelines for Assessing the Nutritional Impact of Supplementary Feeding Programmes for Vulnerable Groups. Geneva: WHO, 1983.
16National Nutrition Monitoring Bureau (NNMB). Diet and Nutritional Status of Rural Population. NNMB Technical Report No. 21. Hyderabad: National Institute of Nutrition, Indian Council of Medical Research, 2002.
17Cole, TJ, Bellizzi, MC, Flegal, KM, Dietz, WH. Establishing a standard definition for child overweight and obesity worldwide: international survey. British Medical Journal 2000; 320: 1240–3.
18Gopalan, C. Multiple micronutrient supplementation in pregnancy. Nutrition Reviews 2002; 60: S2–S6.
19Gupta, AK, Ahmad, AJ. Childhood obesity and hypertension. Indian Pediatrics 1990; 27: 333–7.
20De Onis, M, Blossner, M. Prevalence and trends of overweight among preschool children in developing countries. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2000; 72: 1032–9.
21Vijaylakshmi, K, Reddy, GA, Krishna, TP, Krishnaswamy, K. Obesity in adolescents of different socio-economic groups: prevalence in Andhra Pradesh, India. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2002; 11: S742–3.
22Epstein, LH. Effects in treatment of childhood obesity. International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders 1995; 19: S11721.
23Shetty, P. Childhood obesity in developing countries. NFI Bulletin 1999; 20: 14.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed