Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Improving the nutrition and screen time environment through self-assessment in family childcare homes in Nebraska

  • Dipti A Dev (a1), Natalie Williams (a1), Iheoma Iruka (a2), Aileen S Garcia (a1), Yage Guo (a3), Irina Patwardhan (a4), Katrina Cummings (a5), Zainab Rida (a6), Emily Hulse (a7) and Ami Sedani (a8)...
Abstract
Objective

To determine if family childcare homes (FCCH) in Nebraska meet best practices for nutrition and screen time, and if focusing on nutrition and screen time policies and practices improves the FCCH environment.

Design

A pre–post evaluation was conducted using the Go Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Childcare (Go NAP SACC).

Setting

FCCH in Nebraska, USA.

Subjects

FCCH enrolled in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP; n 208) participated in a pre–post evaluation using Go NAP SACC.

Results

At baseline, all FCCH met the minimum childcare standards for fifty-four of fifty-six practices in nutrition and screen time. After the intervention, FCCH demonstrated significant improvement in fourteen of the forty-four Child Nutrition items and eleven of the twelve Screen Time items. However, FCCH providers did not meet best practices at post-intervention. Lowest scores were found in serving meals family-style, promoting visible support for healthy eating, planned nutrition education and written policy on child nutrition. For screen time, lowest scores were reported on the availability of television, offering families education on screen time and having a written policy on screen time.

Conclusions

FCCH in Nebraska were able to strengthen their policies and practices after utilizing Go NAP SACC. Continued professional development and participation in targeted interventions may assist programmes in sustaining improved practices and policies. Considering the varying standards and policies surrounding FCCH, future studies comparing the current findings with childcare centres and non-CACFP programmes are warranted.

Copyright
Corresponding author
* Corresponding author: Email ddev2@unl.edu
References
Hide All
1. Ogden, CL, Carroll, MD, Kit, BK etal. (2014) Prevalence of childhood and adult obesity in the United States, 2011–2012. JAMA 311, 806814.
2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2012) Nebraska state nutrition, physical activity, and obesity profile. http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/stateprograms/fundedstates/pdf/Nebraska-State-Profile.pdf (accessed June 2017).
3. Spruijt-Metz, D (2011) Etiology, treatment, and prevention of obesity in childhood and adolescence: a decade in review. J Res Adolesc 21, 129152.
4. Laughlin, L (2013) Who’s Minding the Kids? Childcare Arrangements: Spring 2011. Current Population Reports: Household Economic Studies no. 135, pp. 70135. Washington, DC: US Census Bureau.
5. Battista, RA, Oakley, H, Weddell, MS etal. (2014) Improving the physical activity and nutrition environment through self-assessment (NAP SACC) in rural area childcare centers in North Carolina. Prev Med 67, Suppl. 1, S10S16.
6. Alkon, A, Crowley, AA, Benjamin Neelon, SE etal. (2014) Nutrition and physical activity randomized control trial in childcare centers improves knowledge, policies, and children’s body mass index. BMC Public Health 14, 215.
7. Trost, SG, Messner, L, Fitzgerald, K etal. (2009) Nutrition and physical activity policies and practices in family childcare homes. Am J Prev Med 37, 537540.
8. Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services (2017) Early childhood totals of type and capacity. http://dhhs.ne.gov/publichealth/Documents/statewidedata.pdf (accessed May 2018).
9. Ward, D, Morris, E, McWilliams, C etal. (2014) Go NAP SACC: Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care, 2nd ed. Chapel Hill, NC: Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; available at https://gonapsacc.org/resources/nap-sacc-materials
10. Natale, R, Page, M & Sanders, L (2014) Nutrition and physical activity practices in childcare centers versus family childcare homes. Early Child Educ J 42, 327334.
11. Tandon, PS, Garrison, MM & Christakis, DA (2012) Physical activity and beverages in home-and center-based childcare programs. J Nutr Educ Behav 44, 355359.
12. Christakis, DA & Garrison, MM (2009) Preschool-aged children’s television viewing in childcare settings. Pediatrics 124, 16271632.
13. Gunter, KB, Rice, KR & Trost, SG (2012) Nutrition and physical activity policies and practices in family childcare homes in Oregon: baseline findings from the healthy home childcare project. J Ext 50, 3FEA3.
14. Ward, DS, Benjamin, SE, Ammerman, AS etal. (2008) Nutrition and physical activity in child care: results from an environmental intervention. Am J Prev Med 35, 352356.
15. Martin, SL, Martin, MW, Cook, B etal. (2015) Notes from the field: the evaluation of Maine Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Childcare (NAPSACC) experience. Eval Health Prof 38, 140145.
16. Trost, SG, Messner, L, Fitzgerald, K etal. (2011) A nutrition and physical activity intervention for family childcare homes. Am J Prev Med 41, 392398.
17. Wang, Y & Beydoun, MA (2007) The obesity epidemic in the United States – gender, age, socioeconomic, racial/ethnic, and geographic characteristics: a systematic review and meta-regression analysis. Epidemiol Rev 29, 628.
18. US Department of Agriculture (2012) Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Nutrition Standards for CACFP Meals and Snacks. http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/care/ProgramBasics/Meals/Meal_Patterns.htm#Child_Breakfast (accessed April 2012).
19. Benjamin, SE, Neelon, B, Ball, S etal. (2007) Reliability and validity of a nutrition and physical activity environmental self-assessment for child care. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 4, 29.
20. Abdi, H (2007) Bonferroni and Sidak corrections for multiple comparisons. In Encyclopedia of Measurement and Statistics, pp. 103107 [NJ Salkind, editor]. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc.
21. Ritchie, LD, Boyle, M, Chandran, K etal. (2012) Participation in the Child and Adult Care Food Program is associated with more nutritious foods and beverages in child care. Child Obes 8, 224229.
22. Erinosho, T, Vaughn, A, Hales, D etal. (2018) Participation in the Child and Adult Care Food Program is associated with healthier nutrition environments at family child care homes in Mississippi. J Nutr Educ Behav. Published online: 7 February 2018. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2017.11.004.
23. Benjamin-Neelon, S, Vaughn, AE, Tovar, A etal. (2018) The family child care home environment and children’s diet quality. Appetite 126, 108113.
24. Dev, DA, Carraway-Stage, V, Schober, DJ etal. (2017) Implementing the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Benchmarks for Nutrition Education for Children: child-care providers’ perspectives. J Acad Nutr Diet 117, 19631971.
25. Rosenthal, MS, Crowley, AA & Curry, L (2013) Family child care providers’ self-perceived role in obesity prevention: working with children, parents, and external influences. J Nutr Educ Behav 45, 595601.
26. American Academy of Pediatrics, American Public Health Association & National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Childcare and Early Education (2011) Caring for Our Children. National Health and Safety Performance Standards: Guidelines for Early Care and Education Programs, 3rd ed. Elk Grove Village, IL and Washington, DC: American Academy of Pediatrics and American Public Health Association; available at http://cfoc.nrckids.org/files/CFOC3_updated_final.pdf
27. Neelon, SEB & Briley, ME (2011) Position of the American Dietetic Association: benchmarks for nutrition in childcare. J Am Diet Assoc 111, 607615.
28. Fletcher, J, Branen, LJ & Price, E (2005) Building Mealtime Environments and Relationships: An Inventory for Feeding Young Children in Group Settings. http://www.cals.uidaho.edu/feeding/pdfs/BMER.pdf (accessed September 2013).
29. Kim, J, Shim, JE, Wiley, AR etal. (2012) Is there a difference between center and home care providers’ training, perceptions, and practices related to obesity prevention? Matern Child Health J 16, 15591566.
30. Dev, DA, Speirs, KE, McBride, BA etal. (2014) Head Start and childcare providers’ motivators, barriers and facilitators to practicing family-style meal service. Early Child Res Q 29, 649659.
31. Tandon, PS, Zhou, C, Lozano, P etal. (2011) Preschoolers’ total daily screen time at home and by type of childcare. J Pediatr 158, 297300.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 2
Total number of PDF views: 13 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 142 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 1st June 2018 - 20th June 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.