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Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption: success of the Western Australian Go for 2&5®campaign

  • Christina M Pollard (a1) (a2), Margaret R Miller (a2), Alison M Daly (a2), Kathy E Crouchley (a2), Kathy J O’Donoghue (a3), Anthea J Lang (a3) and Colin W Binns (a1)...
Abstract
AbstractObjective

The Western Australian Health Department’s Go for 2&5® campaign aimed to increase adults’ awareness of the need to eat more fruit and vegetables and encourage increased consumption of one serving over five years.

Design

The multi-strategy fruit and vegetable social marketing campaign, conducted from 2002 to 2005, included mass media advertising (television, radio, press and point-of-sale), public relations events, publications, a website (www.gofor2and5.com), and school and community activities. Campaign development and the evaluation framework were designed using health promotion theory, and assessed values, beliefs, knowledge and behaviour. Two independent telephone surveys evaluated the campaign: the Campaign Tracking Survey interviewed 5032 adults monitoring fruit and vegetable attitudes, beliefs and consumption prior to, during and 12 months after the campaign; and the Health & Wellbeing Surveillance System surveyed 17 993 adults between 2001 and 2006, continuously monitoring consumption.

Setting

Population public health intervention–social marketing campaign in Western Australia, population of 2 010 113 in 2005.

Subjects

Adults in the Perth metropolitan area.

Results

The campaign reached the target audience, increasing awareness of the recommended servings of fruit and vegetables. There was a population net increase of 0.8 in the mean number of servings of fruit and vegetables per day over three years (0.2 for fruit (1.6 in 2002 to 1.8 in 2005) and 0.6 for vegetables (2.6 in 2002 to 3.2 in 2005), significant at P < 0.05).

Conclusion

Sustained, well-executed social marketing is effective in improving nutrition knowledge, attitudes and consumption behaviour. The Go for 2&5® campaign provides guidance to future nutrition promotion through social marketing.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Corresponding author: Email C.Pollard@curtin.edu.au
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15 G Egger . Health Promotion Strategies and Methods. Sydney: McGraw-Hill Australia, 1990.

19 C Knai , J Pomerleau , K Lock , M McKee . Getting children to eat more fruit and vegetables: a systematic review. Preventive Medicine 2006; 42 (2): 8595.

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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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