Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

A new stage of the nutrition transition in China

  • Shufa Du (a1) (a2), Bing Lu (a2), Fengying Zhai (a1) and Barry M Popkin (a2)
Abstract
AbstractObjective:

To fully explore the long-term shifts in the nutrition transition and the full implications of these changes in the Chinese diet.

Design:

A descriptive, population-based study.

Setting:

Data come from nationally representative surveys: the China Health and Nutrition Survey (1989–1997), the China National Nutrition Survey (1982 and 1992), the annual household consumption surveys of the State Statistical Bureau, and the Annual Death Report of China.

Results:

During the first part of the major economic transformation in China (before 1985), cereal intake increased but decreased thereafter. There was also a long-term reduction of vegetable consumption that has now stabilised. Intake of animal foods increased slowly before 1979 and more quickly after the economic reforms occurred. While the total energy intake of residents has decreased, as has energy expenditure, large changes in the composition of energy have occurred. The overall proportion of energy from fat increased quickly, reaching an overall average of 27.3% and 32.8% for urban residents in 1997. Over a third of all Chinese adults and 60.1% of those in urban areas consumed over 30% of their energy from fat in 1997. Large shifts towards increased inactivity at work and leisure occurred. These changes are linked with rapid increases of overweight, obesity and diet-related non-communicable diseases (DRNCDs) as well as total mortality for urban residents.

Conclusions:

The long-term trend is a shift towards a high-fat, high-energy-density and low-fibre diet. The Chinese have entered a new stage of the nutrition transition.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      A new stage of the nutrition transition in China
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      A new stage of the nutrition transition in China
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      A new stage of the nutrition transition in China
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email popkin@unc.edu
References
Hide All
1World Bank. World Development Indicators 2001. Washington, DC: World Bank, 2001.
2Du S, Lu B, Zhai F, Popkin BM. The nutrition transition in China: a new stage of the Chinese diet. In: Caballero B, Popkin B, eds. The Nutrition Transition: Diet-related Diseases in the Developing World. London: Academic Press [in press].
3Campbell TC, Parpia B, Chen J. Diet, lifestyle, and the etiology of coronary artery disease: the Cornell China study. Am. J. Cardiol. 1998; 82: 18–21T.
4Popkin BM, Ge K, Zhai F, Guo X, Ma H, Zohoori N. The nutrition transition in China: a cross-sectional analysis. Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 1993; 47: 333–46.
5Popkin BM, Paeratakul S, Zhai F, Ge K. Body weight patterns among the Chinese: results from the 1989 and 1991 China Health and Nutrition Surveys. Am. J. Public Health 1995; 85(5): 690–4.
6Popkin BM. Nutritional patterns and transitions. Popul. Dev. Rev. 1993; 19(1): 138–57.
7Piazza A. Food Consumption and Nutritional Status in the PRC. Westview Special Studies on China. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1986.
8State Statistical Bureau (SSB). China Statistical Yearbook 2000. Beijing: China Statistics Press, 2001.
9Ge K. Summary of the Third National Nutrition Survey. J. Hygiene Res. 1996; 25(Suppl): 18 [in Chinese].
10Popkin BM, Lu B, Zhai F. Understanding the nutrition transition: measuring rapid dietary changes in transitional countries. Public Health Nutr. 2002 [in Press].
11Bell C, Ge K, Popkin BM. Weight gain and its predictors in Chinese adults. Int. J. Obes. Relat. Metab. Disord. 2001; 25: 1079–86.
12Du S, Zhai F, Ge K. Distributions of body mass index in Chinese adults, aged 20–60 years. J. Hygiene Res. 2001 30: 339–42 [in Chinese].
13Ge K, Zhai F, Yan H, eds. The Dietary and Nutritional Status of Chinese Population (1992 National Nutrition Survey). Beijing: People's Medical Publishing House, 1996.
14Inoue S, Zimmet P. The Asia–Pacific perspective: redefining obesity and its treatment. Sydney: Health Communications Australia Pty Ltd, 2000.
15Guo X, Popkin BM, Mroz TA, Zhai F. Food price policy can favorably alter macronutrient intake in China. J. Nutr. 1999; 129: 9941001.
16Popkin BM. The nutrition transition and its health implications in lower income countries. Public Health Nutr. 1998; 1: 521.
17Ministry of Health. Annual Statistical Reports of Death, Injuries and Causes of Death in China, 1979–2000. Beijing: Ministry of Health, 2000.
18Du S, Lu B, Wang Z, Zhai F, Popkin BM. Transition of dietary pattern in China. J. Hygiene Res. 2001; 30: 221–5.
19Du S. Growth and development of children and adolescents of 0–18 years old. In: Ge K, Zhai F, eds. The Dietary and Nutritional Status of Chinese Population – Children and Adolescents (1992 National Nutrition Survey). Vol. 2. Beijing: People's Medical Publishing House, 1999; 1234.
20Doak C, Adair L, Monteiro C, Popkin BM. Overweight and underweight co-exists in Brazil, China, and Russia. J. Nutr. 2000; 130: 2965–80.
21Kim S, Moon S, Popkin BM. The nutrition transition in South Korea. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 2000; 71: 4453.
22Drewnowski A, Popkin BM. The nutrition transition: new trends in the global diet. Nutr. Rev. 1997; 55(2): 3143.
23Binkley JK, Eales J, Jekanowski M. The relation between dietary change and rising obesity. Int. J. Obes. Relat. Metab. Disord. 2000; 24(8): 1032–9.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 2
Total number of PDF views: 403 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 810 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 21st October 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.