Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Obesity and related medical conditions: a role for functional foods

  • Wyndham J Boobier (a1), Julien S Baker (a1) and Bruce Davies (a1)
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Obesity and related medical conditions: a role for functional foods
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Obesity and related medical conditions: a role for functional foods
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Obesity and related medical conditions: a role for functional foods
      Available formats
      ×

Abstract

Copyright

Corresponding author

References

Hide All
1Keys, A. Coronary heart disease in seven countries. Circulation 1970; 41: 11211.
2Gotto, AM Jr. High density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides as therapeutic targets for preventing and treating coronary artery disease. American Heart Journal 2002; 144: S33S42.
3Yudkin, J, Kang, SS, Bruckdorfer, KR. Effects of high dietary sugar. British Medical Journal 1980; 281: 1396.
4Jeppesen, J, Hein, HO, Saudicani, P, Gyntelberg, F. High triglycerides/low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, ischemic electrocardiogram changes, and risk of ischemic heart disease. American Heart Journal 2003; 145: 103–8.
5Zieden, B, Kaminskas, A, Kristenson, M, Olsson, AG, Kucinskiene, Z. Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids may account for higher low-density lipoprotein oxidation susceptibility in Lithuanian compared to Swedish men. Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation 2002; 62: 307–14.
6Nisbett, EF, Rossiter, AH, Miller, AR, Thacker, D. Fat is short dough biscuits. Flour Milling and Baking Research Association. 1986; (2): 6377.
7Davis, MM, Jones, DW. The role of lifestyle management in the overall treatment plan for prevention of management of hypertension. Seminars in Nephrology 2002; 22: 3543.
8Franklin, SS, Khan, SA, Wong, ND, Larson, MG, Levy, D. Is pulse pressure useful in predicting risk factors for coronary heart disease? The Framingham Heart Study. Circulation 1999; 100: 354–60.
9Van den Hoogen, PC, Feskens, EJ, Nagelkerke, NJ, Menotti, A, Nissinen, A, Kromhout, D. The relation between blood pressure and mortality due to coronary heart disease among men in different parts of the world. Seven Countries Study Research Group. New England Journal of Medicine 2000; 342: 18.
10He, J, Ogden, LG, Vupputuri, S, Bazzano, L, Loria, C, Whelton, PK. Dietary sodium intake and myocardial infarction. Journal of the American Medical Association 1999; 282: 2027–34.
11Krauss, RM, Deckelbaum, RJ, Ernst, N, Fisher, E, Howard, BV, Knopp, RH, et al. Dietary guidelines for healthy American adults: a statement for health professionals from the nutrition committee, American Heart Association. Circulation 1996; 94: 1795–800.
12Pietinen, P, Rimm, EB, Korhonen, P, Hartman, AM, Willett, WC, Albanes, D, et al. Intake of dietary fibre and risk of coronary heart disease in a cohort of Finnish men. The alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Prevention Study. Circulation 1996; 94: 2720–7.
13Rimm, EB, Ascherio, A, Giovannucci, E, Spiegelman, D, Stampfer, MJ, Willett, WC. Vegetable, fruit and cereal fibre intake and risk of coronary heart disease among men. Journal of the American Medical Association 1996; 275: 447–51.
14McCully, KS. Vascular pathology of homocysteinemia: implications for the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. American Journal of Pathology 1969; 56: 111–28.
15Klerk, M, Verhoef, P, Verbruggen, B, Schouten, EG, Blom, HJ, Bos, GM, et al. Effect of homocysteine reduction by B vitamin supplementation on marker of clotting activation. Thrombosis and Haemostasis 2002; 88: 230–5.
16Billion, S, Tribout, B, Cadet, E, Queinnec, C, Rochette, J, Wheatley, P, et al. Hyperhomocysteinemia, folate and vitamin B12 in unsupplemented haemodialysis patients: effect of oral therapy with folic acid and vitamin B12. Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation 2002; 17: 455–61.
17Genest, F Jr. Homocysteine: to screen and treat or wait and see? Canadian Medical Association Journal 2000; 163: 37–8.
18Hoefler, G, Harnoncourt, F, Pashcke, E, Mirtl, W, Pfeiffer, KH, Kostner, GM. Lipoprotein(a) Lp(a). A risk factor for myocardial infarction. Arteriosclerosis 1988; 8: 394401.
19Sandkamp, M, Funke, H, Schulte, EK, Assman, G. Lipoprotein(a) is an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction at a young age. Clinical Chemistry 1990; 36: 20–3.
20Rosengren, A, Wilhelmsen, L, Eriksson, E, Risberg, B, Wedel, H. Lipoprotein (a) and coronary heart disease: a prospective case control study in a general population sample of middleaged men. British Medical Journal 1990; 301: 1248–51.
21Batiste, MC, Schaefer, EJ. Diagnosis and management of lipoprotein abnormalities. Nutrition in Clinical Care 2002; 5: 115–23.
22Pieper, JA. Understanding niacin formulations. American Journal of Managed Care 2002; 8: S308–14.
23Pan, J, Van, JT, Chan, RL, Lin, M, Charles, MA. Extended-release niacin treatment of the atherogenic lipid profile and lipoprotein (a) in diabetes. Metabolism 2002; 52: 1120–7.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed