Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Obesogenic diet and physical activity: independent or associated behaviours in adolescents?

  • R Jago (a1), AR Ness (a2), P Emmett (a3), C Mattocks (a4), L Jones (a5) and CJ Riddoch (a4)...
Abstract
AbstractObjective

Associations between diet and physical activity may identify behaviours that could be changed together to prevent childhood obesity. The present study examines associations between physical activity and obesogenic dietary behaviours in a large UK adolescent cohort.

Design

Cross-sectional analysis of a UK cohort. Adolescents aged 10–11 years completed three 1 d diet diaries. Average daily energy consumption, percentage energy from fat and carbohydrate, energy density and grams of fruit and vegetables were estimated. To assess physical activity participants wore an accelerometer for three or more days. Regression models were run by sex to examine the extent to which dietary variables predicted physical activity before and after controlling for pubertal status, maternal education and adiposity.

Setting

The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), south-west England.

Subjects

Adolescents who provided diet data at age 10 years and physical activity data at age 11 years.

Results

Among boys, percentage energy from fat was consistently negatively associated with accelerometer-determined indicators of physical activity (standardized beta (β) = −0·055 to −0·101, P < 0·05) while total energy (β = 0·066 to 0·091, P < 0·05) and percentage energy from carbohydrate (β = 0·054 to 0·106, P < 0·05) were positively associated before and after adjustment for confounders. For girls fruit and vegetable intake was consistently positively associated with physical activity (β = 0·056 to 0·074, P < 0·005). However all associations were weak. Associations were broadly comparable when participants with non-plausible dietary reports were included or excluded from the analyses.

Conclusions

Obesogenic diet and physical activity behaviours were weakly associated, suggesting that interventions should focus on implementing strategies that are independently successful at changing diet or physical activity behaviours either separately or in combination.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Obesogenic diet and physical activity: independent or associated behaviours in adolescents?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Obesogenic diet and physical activity: independent or associated behaviours in adolescents?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Obesogenic diet and physical activity: independent or associated behaviours in adolescents?
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email russ.jago@bris.ac.uk
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 2
Total number of PDF views: 33 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 82 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 25th June 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.