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Overweight in dogs, but not in cats, is related to overweight in their owners

  • Marieke L Nijland (a1), Frank Stam (a2) and Jacob C Seidell (a3)
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To quantify the environmental component of aetiology of overweight and obesity by examining the relationship between the degree of overweight in dogs and cats and the degree of overweight in their owners.

Design

Cross-sectional study. Main outcome measures of the owners were weight, height (stature) and BMI. Of the animals, weight and divergence from ideal weight were measured by a veterinarian.

Setting

Three veterinary clinics in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Subjects

Dogs and cats, together with their owners, who visited the veterinary clinic. Dogs and cats had to be older than 1 year, and their owners had to be at least 21 years old. After exclusion, there remained forty-seven pairs of dogs and their owners and thirty-six pairs of cats and their owners.

Results

We found a significant relationship between the degree of overweight of dogs and the BMI of their owners (r = 0·31). Correction for length of ownership, gender and age of the animal, and gender, age, education level and activity score of the owner did not materially affect this relationship. However, after correction for the amount of time the dog was being walked each day, this relationship disappeared. No significant relationship was found between the degree of overweight of cats and the BMI of their owners.

Conclusions

The degree to which dogs are overweight is, in contrast to the degree to which cats are overweight, related to the BMI of their owners.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email jaap.seidell@falw.vu.nl
Linked references
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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

2. KM Flegal , MD Carroll , CL Ogden & CL Johnson (2002) Prevalence and trends in obesity among US adults, 1999–2000. JAMA 288, 17231727.

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10. GC Wendel-Vos , AJ Schuit , WH Saris & D Kromhout (2003) Reproducibility and relative validity of the short questionnaire to assess health-enhancing physical activity. J Clin Epidemiol 56, 11631169.

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14. ID Robertson (1999) The influence of diet and other factors in owner-perceived obesity in privately owned cats from metropolitan Perth, Western Australia. Prev Vet Med 40, 7585.

15. H Cutt , B Gilles-Corti , M Knuiman & V Burke (2007) Dog ownership, health and physical activity: a critical review of the literature. Health Place 13, 261272.

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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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