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    Shin, Dayeon Lee, Kyung and Song, Won 2016. Pre-Pregnancy Weight Status Is Associated with Diet Quality and Nutritional Biomarkers during Pregnancy. Nutrients, Vol. 8, Issue. 3, p. 162.


    Marques, Andrea Horvath Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise Teixeira, Antônio L. and Silverman, Marni N. 2015. Maternal stress, nutrition and physical activity: Impact on immune function, CNS development and psychopathology. Brain Research, Vol. 1617, p. 28.


    Vidakovic, Aleksandra Jelena Jaddoe, Vincent W. V. Gishti, Olta Felix, Janine F. Williams, Michelle A. Hofman, Albert Demmelmair, Hans Koletzko, Berthold Tiemeier, Henning and Gaillard, Romy 2015. Body mass index, gestational weight gain and fatty acid concentrations during pregnancy: the Generation R Study. European Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 30, Issue. 11, p. 1175.


    Ahmed, Faruk and Tseng, Marilyn 2013. Diet and nutritional status during pregnancy. Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 16, Issue. 08, p. 1337.


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Pre-pregnancy obesity and maternal nutritional biomarker status during pregnancy: a factor analysis

  • Laura E Tomedi (a1), Chung-Chou H Chang (a2), PK Newby (a3) (a4) (a5), Rhobert W Evans (a1), James F Luther (a1), Katherine L Wisner (a1) (a6) (a7) and Lisa M Bodnar (a1) (a6) (a7)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980013000736
  • Published online: 25 March 2013
Abstract
AbstractObjective

Pre-pregnancy obesity has been associated with adverse birth outcomes. Poor essential fatty acid (EFA) and micronutrient status during pregnancy may contribute to these associations. We assessed the associations between pre-pregnancy BMI and nutritional patterns of maternal micronutrient and EFA status during mid-pregnancy.

Design

A cross-sectional analysis from a prospective cohort study. Women provided non-fasting blood samples at ≤20 weeks’ gestation that were assayed for red cell EFA; plasma folate, homocysteine and ascorbic acid; and serum retinol, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, α-tocopherol, soluble transferrin receptors and carotenoids. These nutritional biomarkers were employed in a factor analysis and three patterns were derived: EFA, Micronutrients and Carotenoids.

Setting

The Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy Study, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Subjects

Pregnant women (n 129).

Results

After adjustment for parity, race/ethnicity and age, obese pregnant women were 3·0 (95 % CI 1·1, 7·7) times more likely to be in the lowest tertile of the EFA pattern and 4·5 (95 % CI 1·7, 12·3) times more likely to be in the lowest tertile of the Carotenoid pattern compared with their lean counterparts. We found no association between pre-pregnancy obesity and the Micronutrient pattern after confounder adjustment.

Conclusions

Our results suggest that obese pregnant women have diminished EFA and carotenoid concentrations.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email bodnar@edc.pitt.edu
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26.LM Bodnar , AM Siega-Riz , HN Simhan et al. (2010) The impact of exposure misclassification on associations between prepregnancy BMI and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Obesity (Silver Spring) 18, 21842190.

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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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