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Pre-pregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain and postpartum weight retention: a meta-analysis of observational studies

  • Ke Rong (a1), Kai Yu (a2), Xiaolong Han (a3), Ignatius MY Szeto (a2), Xueying Qin (a4), Junkuan Wang (a2), Yibing Ning (a2), Peiyu Wang (a4) and Defu Ma (a4)...

Abstract

Objective

To determine the association of gestational weight gain (GWG) or pre-pregnancy BMI with postpartum weight retention (PPWR).

Design

Meta-analysis.

Setting

PubMed, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, Current Contents Connects and Biosis Previews were used to search articles.

Subjects

Publications that described the influence of pre-pregnancy BMI or GWG on PPWR.

Results

Seventeen studies that satisfied the eligibility criteria were included in the analyses. Women with inadequate and excessive GWG had significantly lower mean PPWR of −2·14 kg (95 % CI –2·43, –1·85 kg) and higher PPWR of 3·21 kg (95 % CI 2·79, 3·62 kg), respectively, than women with adequate GWG. When postpartum time spans were stratified into 1–3 months, 3–6 months, 6–12 months, 12–36 months and ≥15 years, the association between inadequate GWG and PPWR faded over time and became insignificant (−1·42 kg; 95 % CI −3·08, 0·24 kg) after ≥15 years. However, PPWR in women with excess GWG exhibited a U-shaped trend; that is, a decline during the early postpartum time span (year 1) and then an increase in the following period. Meta-analysis of qualitative studies showed a significant relationship between excessive GWG and higher PPWR risk (OR=2·08; 95 % CI 1·60, 2·70). Moreover, meta-analysis of pre-pregnancy BMI on PPWR indicated that mean PPWR decreased with increasing BMI group.

Conclusions

These findings suggest that GWG, rather than pre-pregnancy BMI, determines the shorter- or longer-term PPWR.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email madefu@bjmu.edu.cn

References

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