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Psychosocial and demographic predictors of fruit, juice and vegetable consumption among 11–14-year-old Boy Scouts

  • M Shayne Gallaway (a1), Russell Jago (a2), Tom Baranowski (a3), Janice C Baranowski (a3) and Pamela M Diamond (a4)...
Abstract
AbstractObjective

Psychosocial and demographic correlates of fruit, juice and vegetable (FJV) consumption were investigated to guide how to increase FJV intake.

Design

Hierarchical multiple regression analysis of FJV consumption on demographics and psychosocial variables.

Setting

Houston, Texas, USA.

Subjects

Boys aged 11–14 years (n = 473).

Results

FJV preference and availability were both significant predictors of FJV consumption, controlling for demographics and clustering of Boy Scout troops. Vegetable self-efficacy was associated with vegetable consumption. The interaction of preference by home availability was a significant predictor of FJV. The interaction of self-efficacy by home availability showed a trend towards significantly predicting vegetable consumption. No significant interactions were found between body mass index and the psychosocial variables.

Conclusions

Findings suggest that future interventions emphasising an increase in preference, availability and efficacy may increase consumption of FJV in similar populations.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email Michael.S.Gallaway@uth.tmc.edu
References
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