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    Park, Sohyun and Lee, Jounghee 2016. ‘When operating a cafeteria, sales come before nutrition’ – finding barriers and facilitators to serving reduced-sodium meals in worksite cafeterias. Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 19, Issue. 08, p. 1506.


    Kelly, C. Geaney, F. Fitzgerald, A.P. Browne, G.M. and Perry, I.J. 2015. Validation of diet and urinary excretion derived estimates of sodium excretion against 24-h urine excretion in a worksite sample. Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, Vol. 25, Issue. 8, p. 771.


    Lassen, A.D. Beck, A. Leedo, E. Andersen, E.W. Christensen, T. Mejborn, H. Thorsen, A.V. and Tetens, I. 2014. Effectiveness of offering healthy labelled meals in improving the nutritional quality of lunch meals eaten in a worksite canteen. Appetite, Vol. 75, p. 128.


    Niebylski, Mark Lu, Tammy Campbell, Norm Arcand, Joanne Schermel, Alyssa Hua, Diane Yeates, Karen Tobe, Sheldon Twohig, Patrick L'Abbé, Mary and Liu, Peter 2014. Healthy Food Procurement Policies and Their Impact. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol. 11, Issue. 3, p. 2608.


    Geaney, Fiona Scotto Di Marrazzo, Jessica Kelly, Clare Fitzgerald, Anthony P Harrington, Janas M Kirby, Ann McKenzie, Ken Greiner, Birgit and Perry, Ivan J 2013. The food choice at work study: effectiveness of complex workplace dietary interventions on dietary behaviours and diet-related disease risk - study protocol for a clustered controlled trial. Trials, Vol. 14, Issue. 1, p. 370.


    Yngve, Agneta Hodge, Allison Tseng, Marilyn Haapala, Irja and McNeill, Geraldine 2011. Public health nutrition interventions can be simple and effective. Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 14, Issue. 08, p. 1321.


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The impact of a workplace catering initiative on dietary intakes of salt and other nutrients: a pilot study

  • F Geaney (a1), J Harrington (a1), AP Fitzgerald (a1) and IJ Perry (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980010003484
  • Published online: 18 January 2011
Abstract
AbstractObjective

Owing to modern lifestyles, individuals are dependent on out-of-home eating. The catering sector can have a pivotal role in influencing our food choices. The objective of the present study was to examine the impact of a structured catering initiative on food choices in a public sector workplace setting.

Design

A cross-sectional comparison study in two hospitals, one of which had implemented a catering initiative designed to provide nutritious food while reducing sugar, fat and salt intakes.

Setting

Two public sector hospitals in Cork, Ireland.

Subjects

A total of 100 random participants aged 18–64 years (fifty intervention, fifty non-intervention) who consumed at least one main meal in the hospital staff canteen daily. Each respondent was asked to complete one anonymous 24 h dietary recall and questionnaire. Food and nutrient analysis was conducted using WISP (Weighed Intake Software Program).

Results

Reported mean intakes of total sugars (P < 0·001), total fat (P < 0·000), saturated fat (P < 0·000) and salt (P < 0·046) were significantly lower in the intervention hospital when adjusted for age and gender. In the intervention hospital, 72 % of respondents, compared with 42 % in the non-intervention hospital, complied with the recommended under-3 daily servings of food high in fat and sugar (P < 0·005). In the intervention hospital, 43 % of respondents exceeded the recommended salt intake of 4–6 g/d, compared with 57 % in the non-intervention hospital.

Conclusions

Structured catering initiatives in the workplace are a potentially important option in the promotion of healthy food choices. Targeted public health programmes and health policy changes are needed to motivate caterers in the public sector and other industries to develop interventions that promote a healthy diet.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email f.geaney@ucc.ie
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3.K Bennett , Z Kabir , B Unal (2006) Explaining the recent decrease in coronary heart disease mortality rates in Ireland, 1985. J Epidemiol Commun Health 60, 322327.

5.K Bibbins-Domingo , GM Chertow , PG Coxson (2010) Projected effect of dietary salt reductions on future cardiovascular disease. N Engl J Med 362, 590599.

6.K Addley , P McQuillan & M Ruddle (2001) Creating healthy workplaces in Northern Ireland: evaluation of a lifestyle and physical activity assessment programme. Occup Med (Lond) 51, 439449.

9.AF Luzzi , M Gibney & M Sjostrom (2001) Nutrition and diet for healthy lifestyles in Europe: the Eurodiet evidence. Public Health Nutr 4, 437438.

18.P Padrão , N Lunet , A Santos (2007) Smoking, alcohol, and dietary choices: evidence from the Portuguese National Health Survey. BMC Public Health 7, 138.

19.S Levin (1996) Pilot study of a cafeteria program relying primarily on symbols to promote healthy choices. J Nutr Educ Behav 28, 282285.

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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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