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Trans-fatty acids in cooking oils in Bogota, Colombia: changes in the food supply from 2008 to 2013

  • Meghan Moynihan (a1), Eduardo Villamor (a2), Constanza Marin (a3), Mercedes Mora-Plazas (a3), Hannia Campos (a4) and Ana Baylin (a2)...
Abstract
Objective

Long-chain n-3 fatty acid intake in Colombia is low because fish consumption is limited. Vegetable oils with high n-3 fatty acid content are recommended, but their concentrations of trans fats were high in previous studies. Thus, regular monitoring of the fatty acid composition of vegetable oils is required. Our objective was to quantify the fatty acid composition in commercially available oils in Bogota, Colombia and determine if composition changed from 2008 to 2013.

Design

Cross-sectional study. We obtained samples of all commercially available oils reported in a survey of low- and middle-income families with a child participating in the Bogota School Children Cohort.

Setting

Bogota, Colombia.

Subjects

Not applicable.

Results

Sunflower oil had the highest trans-fatty acid content (2·18 %). Canola oil had the lowest proportion of trans-fatty acids (0·40 %) and the highest n-3 fatty acid content (9·37 %). In terms of percentage reduction from 2008 to 2013 in 18:1 and 18:2 trans-fatty acids, canola oil had 89 % and 65 % reduction, mixed oils had 44 % and 48 % reduction, and sunflower oil had 25 % and 51 % reduction, respectively. Soyabean oil became widely available in 2013.

Conclusions

The content of trans-fatty acids decreased in all oils from 2008 to 2013, suggesting a voluntary reduction by industry. We believe that regular monitoring of the fatty acid composition of oils is warranted.

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Corresponding author
* Corresponding author: Email abaylin@umich.edu
References
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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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