Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa
  • Access
  • Cited by 50
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Caspi, Caitlin Eicher Davey, Cynthia Friebur, Robin and Nanney, Marilyn S. 2016. Results of a Pilot Intervention in Food Shelves to Improve Healthy Eating and Cooking Skills Among Adults Experiencing Food Insecurity. Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition, p. 1.


    Chang, Mei-Wei Brown, Roger and Nitzke, Susan 2016. Fast Food Intake in Relation to Employment Status, Stress, Depression, and Dietary Behaviors in Low-Income Overweight and Obese Pregnant Women. Maternal and Child Health Journal, Vol. 20, Issue. 7, p. 1506.


    Kegler, Michelle C. Haardörfer, Regine Alcantara, Iris C. Gazmararian, Julie A. Veluswamy, J. K. Hodge, Tarccara L. Addison, Ann R. and Hotz, James A. 2016. Impact of Improving Home Environments on Energy Intake and Physical Activity: A Randomized Controlled Trial. American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 106, Issue. 1, p. 143.


    Raber, Margaret Chandra, Joya Upadhyaya, Mudita Schick, Vanessa Strong, Larkin L. Durand, Casey and Sharma, Shreela 2016. An evidence-based conceptual framework of healthy cooking. Preventive Medicine Reports, Vol. 4, p. 23.


    Dubowitz, Tamara Cohen, Deborah A. Huang, Christina Y. Beckman, Robin A. and Collins, Rebecca L. 2015. Using a Grocery List Is Associated With a Healthier Diet and Lower BMI Among Very High-Risk Adults. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Vol. 47, Issue. 3, p. 259.


    Ducrot, Pauline Méjean, Caroline Allès, Benjamin Fassier, Philippine Hercberg, Serge and Péneau, Sandrine 2015. Motives for dish choices during home meal preparation: results from a large sample of the NutriNet-Santé study. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, Vol. 12, Issue. 1,


    Larson, Nicole Eisenberg, Marla E. Berge, Jerica M. Arcan, Chrisa and Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne 2015. Ethnic/racial disparities in adolescents' home food environments and linkages to dietary intake and weight status. Eating Behaviors, Vol. 16, p. 43.


    McGowan, Laura Caraher, Martin Raats, Monique Lavelle, Fiona Hollywood, Lynsey McDowell, Dawn Spence, Michelle McCloat, Amanda Mooney, Elaine and Dean, Moira 2015. Domestic Cooking and Food Skills: A Review. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, p. 00.


    Reid, Mike Worsley, Anthony and Mavondo, Felix 2015. The Obesogenic Household: Factors Influencing Dietary Gatekeeper Satisfaction with Family Diet. Psychology & Marketing, Vol. 32, Issue. 5, p. 544.


    VanKim, Nicole A. Erickson, Darin J. and Laska, Melissa N. 2015. Food Shopping Profiles and Their Association with Dietary Patterns: A Latent Class Analysis. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 115, Issue. 7, p. 1109.


    Bowerman, Susan 2014. Immunonutrition.


    Griffin, Mary K. and Sobal, Jeffery 2014. Consumer Food System Participation: A Community Analysis. Ecology of Food and Nutrition, Vol. 53, Issue. 6, p. 579.


    Kegler, Michelle C. Alcantara, Iris Haardörfer, Regine Gazmararian, Julie A. Ballard, Denise and Sabbs, Darrell 2014. The Influence of Home Food Environments on Eating Behaviors of Overweight and Obese Women. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Vol. 46, Issue. 3, p. 188.


    Monsivais, Pablo Aggarwal, Anju and Drewnowski, Adam 2014. Time Spent on Home Food Preparation and Indicators of Healthy Eating. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 47, Issue. 6, p. 796.


    Reicks, Marla Trofholz, Amanda C. Stang, Jamie S. and Laska, Melissa N. 2014. Impact of Cooking and Home Food Preparation Interventions Among Adults: Outcomes and Implications for Future Programs. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Vol. 46, Issue. 4, p. 259.


    Vidgen, Helen Anna and Gallegos, Danielle 2014. Defining food literacy and its components. Appetite, Vol. 76, p. 50.


    Ball, Kylie McNaughton, Sarah A Le, Ha Andrianopoulos, Nick Inglis, Victoria McNeilly, Briohny Lichomets, Irene Granados, Alba and Crawford, David 2013. ShopSmart 4 Health – Protocol of a skills-based randomised controlled trial promoting fruit and vegetable consumption among socioeconomically disadvantaged women. BMC Public Health, Vol. 13, Issue. 1,


    Fruh, Sharon M. Mulekar, Madhuri S. Hall, Heather R. Fulkerson, Jayne A. Hanks, Roma Stovall Lemley, Trey Evans, Britney and Dierking, Jennifer 2013. Perspectives of Community Health Advocates: Barriers to Healthy Family Eating Patterns. The Journal for Nurse Practitioners, Vol. 9, Issue. 7, p. 416.


    Fruh, Sharon M. Mulekar, Madhuri S. Hall, Heather R. Adams, James R. Lemley, Trey Evans, Britney and Dierking, Jennifer 2013. Meal-Planning Practices with Individuals in Health Disparity Zip Codes. The Journal for Nurse Practitioners, Vol. 9, Issue. 6, p. 344.


    Plessz, M. and Gojard, S. 2013. Do processed vegetables reduce the socio-economic differences in vegetable purchases? A study in France. The European Journal of Public Health, Vol. 23, Issue. 5, p. 747.


    ×

Which food-related behaviours are associated with healthier intakes of fruits and vegetables among women?

  • David Crawford (a1), Kylie Ball (a1), Gita Mishra (a2), Jo Salmon (a1) and Anna Timperio (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980007246798
  • Published online: 01 March 2007
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To examine associations between shopping, food preparation, meal and eating behaviours and fruit and vegetable intake among women.

Design

Cross-sectional survey.

Setting

Community-based sample from metropolitan Melbourne, Australia.

Subjects

A sample of 1136 women aged 18–65 years, randomly selected from the electoral roll.

Results

Food-related behaviours reflecting organisation and forward-planning, as well as enjoyment of and high perceived value of meal shopping, preparation and consumption were associated with healthier intakes of fruits and vegetables. For example, women who more frequently planned meals before they went shopping, wrote a shopping list, enjoyed food shopping, planned in the morning what they will eat for dinner that night, planned what they will eat for lunch, reported they enjoy cooking, liked trying new recipes and who reported they sometimes prepare dishes ahead of time were more likely to consume two or more servings of vegetables daily. Conversely, women who frequently found cooking a chore, spent less than 15 minutes preparing dinner, decided on the night what they will eat for dinner, ate in a fast-food restaurant, ate takeaway meals from a fast-food restaurant, ate dinner and snacks while watching television and who frequently ate on the run were less likely to eat two or more servings of vegetables daily.

Conclusions

Practical strategies based on these behavioural characteristics could be trialled in interventions aimed at promoting fruit and vegetable consumption among women.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Which food-related behaviours are associated with healthier intakes of fruits and vegetables among women?
      Your Kindle email address
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Which food-related behaviours are associated with healthier intakes of fruits and vegetables among women?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Which food-related behaviours are associated with healthier intakes of fruits and vegetables among women?
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email dcraw@deakin.edu.au
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

1AR Ness , JW Powles . Fruit and vegetables, and cardiovascular disease: a review. International Journal of Epidemiology 1997; 26: 113.

3KA Steinmetz , JD Potter . Vegetables, fruit and cancer prevention: a review. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 1996; 96: 1027–39.

6MK Serdula , C Gillespie , L Kettel-khan , R Farris , J Seymour , C Denny . Trends in fruit and vegetable consumption in the United States: behavioral risk factor surveillance system, 1994–2000. American Journal of Public Health 2004; 94: 1014–8.

7R Lang , CW Thane , C Bolton-Smith , SA Jebb . Consumption of whole-grain foods by British adults: findings from further analysis of two national dietary surveys. Public Health Nutrition 2003; 6: 479–84.

8GJ Stables , AF Subar , BH Patterson , K Dodd , J Heimendinger , MAS Van Duyn , . Changes in vegetable and fruit consumption and awareness among US adults: results of the 1991 and 1997 5 A Day for Better Health Program surveys. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2002; 102: 809–17.

9SM Krebs-Smith , J Heimendinger , BH Patterson , AF Subar , R Kessler , E Pivonka . Psychosocial factors associated with fruit and vegetable consumption. American Journal of Health Promotion 1995; 10: 98104.

10J Brug , K Glanz , G Kok . The relationship between self-efficacy, attitudes, intake compared to others, consumption, and stages of change related to fruit and vegetables. American Journal of Health Promotion 1997; 12: 2530.

11S Havas , K Treiman , P Langenberg , M Ballesteros , J Anliker , D Damron , . Factors associated with fruit and vegetable consumption among women participating in WIC. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 1998; 98: 1141–8.

12E Trudeau , AR Kristal , S Li , RE Patterson . Demographic and psychosocial predictors of fruit and vegetable intakes differ: implications for dietary interventions. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 1998; 98: 1412–7.

14T Baranowski , K Weber Cullen , J Baranowski . Psychosocial correlates of dietary intake: advancing dietary intervention. Annual Review of Nutrition 1999; 19: 1740.

15MA Van Duyn , AR Kristal , K Dodd , MK Campbell , AF Subar , G Stables , . Association of awareness, intrapersonal and interpersonal factors, and stage of dietary change with fruit and vegetable consumption: a national survey. American Journal of Health Promotion 2001; 16: 6978.

16K Giskes , G Turrell , C Patterson , B Newman . Socio-economic differences in fruit and vegetable consumption among Australian adolescents and adults. Public Health Nutrition 2002; 5: 663–9.

17A Steptoe , L Perkins-Porras , C McKay , E Rink , S Hilton , FP Cappuccio . Psychological factors associated with fruit and vegetable intake and with biomarkers in adults from a low-income neighbourhood. Health Psychology 2003; 22: 148–55.

18S Friel , J Newell , C Kelleher . Who eats four or more servings of fruit and vegetables per day? Multivariate classification tree analysis of data from the 1998 Survey of Lifestyle, Attitudes and Nutrition in the Republic of Ireland. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8: 159–69.

19H Billson , JA Pryer , R Nichols . Variation in fruit and vegetable consumption among adults in Britain. An analysis from the dietary and nutritional survey of British adults. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1999; 53: 946–52.

20JA Satia , AR Kristal , RE Patterson , ML Neuhouser , E Trudeau . Psychosocial factors and dietary habits associated with vegetable consumption. Nutrition 2002; 18: 247–54.

21JA Satia , JA Galanko , AM Siega-Riz . Eating at fast-food restaurants is associated with dietary intake, demographic, psychosocial and behavioural factors among African Americans in North Carolina. Public Health Nutrition 2004; 7: 1089–96.

22TM Horacek , A White , NM Betts , S Hoerr , C Georgiou , S Nitzke , . Self-efficacy, perceived benefits, and weight satisfaction discriminate among stages of change for fruit and vegetable intakes for young men and women. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2002; 102: 1466–70.

23S Wilcox , D Parra-Medina , M Thompson-Robinson , J Will . Nutrition and physical activity interventions to reduce cardiovascular disease risk in health care settings: a quantitative review with a focus on women. Nutrition Reviews 2001; 59: 197214.

24AS Ammerman , CH Lindquist , KN Lohr , J Hersey . The efficacy of behavioral interventions to modify dietary fat and fruit and vegetable intake: a review of the evidence. Preventive Medicine 2002; 35: 2541.

25G Sorensen , L Linnan , MK Hunt . Worksite-based research and initiatives to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. Preventive Medicine 2004; 39: S94100.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords: