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    Bermejo, Rosa M. Parra-Hidalgo, Pedro Oliver-Roig, Antonio Hidalgo, M. Dolores Arellano-Morata, Carmen and García-de-León-González, Ricardo 2016. Development and Assessment of a Questionnaire to Study Protection, Promotion, and Support of Breastfeeding. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing, Vol. 45, Issue. 2, p. 166.


    Yngve, Agneta 2007. What stops healthy choices?. Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 10, Issue. 07,


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Who's keeping the code? Compliance with the international code for the marketing of breast-milk substitutes in Greater Glasgow

  • Rhona J McInnes (a1), Charlotte Wright (a2), Shogufta Haq (a3) and Margaret McGranachan (a4)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980007441453
  • Published online: 01 July 2007
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To evaluate compliance with the World Health Organization's International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes in primary care, after the introduction of strict local infant feeding guidelines.

Design

An audit form was sent to all community-based health professionals with an infant feeding remit. Walking tours were conducted in a random sample of community care facilities.

Setting

Greater Glasgow Primary Care Division.

Subjects

(1) Primary-care staff with an infant feeding remit; (2) community health-care facilities.

Main outcome measures

Contact with manufacturers of breast-milk substitutes (BMS) and BMS company personnel, free samples or incentives, and advertising of BMS.

Results

Contact with company personnel was minimal, usually unsolicited and was mainly to provide product information. Free samples of BMS or feeding equipment were rare but childcare or parenting literature was more prevalent. Staff voiced concerns about the lack of relevant information for bottle-feeding mothers and the need to support the mother's feeding choice. One-third of facilities were still displaying materials non-compliant with the Code, with the most common materials being weight conversion charts and posters.

Conclusions

Contact between personnel from primary care and BMS companies was minimal and generally unsolicited. The presence of materials from BMS companies in health-care premises was more common. Due to the high level of bottle-feeding in Glasgow, primary-care staff stated a need for information about BMS.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email rjm2@stir.ac.uk
Linked references
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4CM Wright , AJR Waterston . Relationships between paediatricians and infant formula milk companies. Archives of Disease in Childhood 2006; 91: 383–5.

6A Taylor . Violations of the international code of marketing of breast milk substitutes: prevalence in four countries. British Medical Journal 1998; 316: 1117–22.

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16EC Halperin , P Hutchison , RC Barrier . A population based study of the prevalence and influence of gifts to radiation oncologists from pharmaceutical companies and medical equipment manufacturers. International Journal of Radiation Oncology and Biological Physics 2004; 59: 1477–83.

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19C Howard , F Howard , R Lawrence , E Andresen , E DeBlieck , M Weitzman . Office prenatal formula advertising and its effect on breast-feeding patterns. Obstetrics and Gynecology 2000; 95: 296303.

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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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