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Problems and Methods of Dating Low-Activity Samples by Liquid Scintillation Counting

  • Kh. A. Arslanov (a1), T. V. Tertychnaya (a1) and S. B. Chernov (a1)
Abstract

The important problem of contamination of old samples by younger 14C necessitates treatment of organic and carbonate samples to ensure more complete removal of contaminating carbon. Here we present studies of chemical procedures for the liquid scintillation method of 14C dating undertaken since 1960 in the former USSR. We discuss new procedures such as lithium carbide synthesis from charred organic samples and benzene synthesis on a V2O5·Al2O3·SiO2 catalyst, as well as memory effect in the carbide synthesis procedure and characteristics of two homemade counters.

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References
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Kh. A. Arslanov and Yu. S. Svezhentsev 1993 An improved method for radiocarbon dating fossil bones. Radiocarbon, this issue.

H. A. Polach and J. J. Stipp 1967 Improved synthesis technique for methane and benzene radiocarbon dating. International Journal of Applied Radiation and Isotopes 18(6): 359365.

C. J. Radnell and A. B. Muller 1980 Memory effects in the production of benzene for radiocarbon dating. In M. Stuiver and R. S. Kra , eds., Proceedings of the 10th International 14C Conference. Radiocarbon 22(2): 479486.

M. A. Tamers 1969 Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas natural radiocarbon measurements IV. Radiocarbon 11(2): 396422.

M. A. Tamers 1975 Chemical yield optimisation of the benzene synthesis for radiocarbon dating. International Journal of Applied Radiation and Isotopes 26(11): 676683.

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Radiocarbon
  • ISSN: 0033-8222
  • EISSN: 1945-5755
  • URL: /core/journals/radiocarbon
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