Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-558cb97cc8-kwsbc Total loading time: 0.274 Render date: 2022-10-06T05:25:12.192Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

‘God told me to do it’: sceptical theism and perceiving God

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 July 2011

JOSHUA SEIGAL*
Affiliation:
Brasenose College, Oxford OX1 4AJ

Abstract

In this article I highlight a tension between Alston's core thesis in his seminal book Perceiving God – that beliefs about God formed on the basis of mystical perception are prima facie justified – and a currently popular method for disarming a certain form of the argument from evil, a method which involves adopting a view known as sceptical theism.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Adams, R. M. (1994) ‘Religious disagreements and doxastic practices’, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54, 885890.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Alston, W. P. (1991) Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience (Ithaca: Cornell University Press).Google Scholar
Alston, W. P. (1996) ‘Some (temporarily) final thoughts on evidential arguments from evil’, in Howard-Snyder, D. (ed.) The Evidential Argument From Evil (Bloomington: Indiana University Press), 311332.Google Scholar
Gale, R. (1994a) ‘The overall argument of Alston's Perceiving God’, Religious Studies 30, 135149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gale, R. (1994b) ‘Why Alston's mystical doxastic practice is subjective’, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54, 869875.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kant, I. (1979) The Conflict of the Faculties, M. J. Gregor (tr.) (Norwalk: Abaris Books).Google Scholar
Martin, C. B. (1959) Religious Belief (Ithaca: Cornell University Press).Google Scholar
Plantinga, A. (1996) ‘Epistemic probability and evil’, in Howard-Snyder, D. (ed.) The Evidential Argument from Evil (Bloomington: Indiana University Press), 6997.Google Scholar
Rissler, J. D. (2002) ‘A psychological constraint on obedience to God's commands: the reasonableness of obeying the abhorrently evil’, Religious Studies 38, 125146.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rowe, W. L. (1979) ‘The problem of evil and some varieties of atheism’, American Philosophical Quarterly 16, 335341.Google Scholar
Rowe, W. L. (1982) ‘Religious experience and the principle of credulity’, International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13, 8592.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Steup, M. (1997) ‘Critical study: William Alston, Perceiving God: the epistemology of religious experience’, Nous 31, 408420.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Turri, J. (2008) ‘Practical and epistemic justification in Alston's Perceiving God, Faith and Philosophy 25, 112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wykstra, S. J. (1984) ‘The Humean obstacle to evidential arguments from suffering: on avoiding the evils of “appearance” ’, International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 16, 7393.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

‘God told me to do it’: sceptical theism and perceiving God
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

‘God told me to do it’: sceptical theism and perceiving God
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

‘God told me to do it’: sceptical theism and perceiving God
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *