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Extending Working Lives? Employability, Work Ability and Better Quality Working Lives

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2011

Tony Maltby*
Affiliation:
Honorary Research Fellow, Department of Sociological Studies, University of Sheffield and Centre for Labour Market Studies, University of Leicester Email: t.maltby@shef.ac.uk

Abstract

Faced with a changing economic and demographic outlook, this article will suggest the adoption of a proactive and preventative approach to the quality of work and ‘worklife’ for the UK's ‘older workers’. Ultimately, it seeks to explore the possibilities for the implementation of the Finnish concept of Work Ability (Illmarinen, 2005) in the context of the UK policy agenda. It will be suggest that this approach provides a policy framework that addresses recessionary pressures whilst maximising quality of life and the active ageing of individuals.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

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