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Gender Differences in the Influence of Parenting on Youth Antisocial Behavior through Deviant Peers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 October 2017

Olalla Cutrín
Affiliation:
Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain)
José Antonio Gómez-Fraguela
Affiliation:
Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain)
Jorge Sobral
Affiliation:
Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain)
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess gender differences in direct and indirect effects of parental knowledge, family support, family conflict, and deviant peers on violent and nonviolent antisocial behavior among youngsters. The total sample was composed of 584 young people, 274 males and 310 females, aged 14 to 20 from High Schools of Galicia (NW Spain). The variables were assessed with different scales of the protocol Valoración del Riesgo en Adolescentes Infractores [Juvenile Offender’s Risk Assessment]. Several structural equation models were conducted to clarify the relationships between these variables for males and females. The results showed a better fit for the mediated model. Significant direct effects were found for parental knowledge (β = –.35, p < .01, males; β = –.16, p < .05, females) and parental support (β = .26, p < .05, males) on nonviolent behavior. Significant direct effects were also found for parental knowledge (β = –.36, p < .05, males; β = –.42, p < .05, females) and parental support (β = .32, p < .05, males; β = .24, p < .05, females) on violent behavior. Not significant direct effects were found for family conflict. Moreover, significant indirect effects through deviant peers were found for knowledge (β = –.23, p < .01, males; β = –.21, p < .01, females), support (β = .20, p < .05, males; β = .21, p < .05, females), and conflict (β = .28, p < .01, males; β = .26, p < .05, females) on nonviolent behavior, as well as for knowledge (β = –.20, p < .01, males; β = –.10, p < .01, females), support (β = .18, p < .01, males; β = .10, p < .01, females), and conflict (β = .24, p < .05, males; β = .12, p < .01, females) on violent behavior. Thus, significant gender differences were found, specifically in the direct effects of family support on nonviolent antisocial behavior. The implications of these results for prevention of antisocial behaviors in youth based on gender differences are discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Universidad Complutense de Madrid and Colegio Oficial de Psicólogos de Madrid 2017 

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Footnotes

How to cite this article:

Cutrín Mosteiro, O., Gómez-Fraguela, J. A., & Sobral, J. (2017). Gender differences in the influence of parenting on youth antisocial behavior through deviant peers. The Spanish Journal of Psychology, 20. e58. Doi:10.1017/sjp.2017.53

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