Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

A Shared Past and a Common Future: The Portuguese Colonial War and the Dynamics of Group-Based Guilt

  • Ana Figueiredo (a1), Joaquim Valentim (a1) and Bertjan Doosje (a2)
Abstract

In the present study we examine feelings of group-based guilt among Portuguese people in relation to the Portuguese colonial war, and their consequences for social behaviour. Specifically, we focus on the way Portuguese university students identify with their national group and the outgroup and their feelings of group-based guilt regarding their group's past misdeeds during the colonial period. The consequences of group-based guilt are also analyzed. 130 Portuguese university students answered a questionnaire and results show that students feel low levels of group-based guilt in relation to this period. Our results show that ingroup glorification is positively related with the use of cognitions to justify the ingroup's behaviour, presumably to avoid responsibility for the harm committed by the ingroup. Outgroup identification correlates with compensatory behavioural intentions and openness to negative information about the colonial war. As expected, feelings of group-based guilt show a significant correlation with compensatory behavioural intentions. Links between political orientation, ingroup attachment and glorification, exonerating cognitions and group-based guilt are analyzed and their implications for intergroup relations are discussed.

En el presente estudio se examinan los sentimientos de culpa colectiva entre los portugueses en relación a la guerra colonial portuguesa, y sus consecuencias en el comportamiento social. En concreto, nos centramos en la manera en que los estudiantes universitarios portugueses se identifican con su grupo nacional y el exogrupo y sus sentimientos de culpa colectiva con respecto a los errores de su grupo durante el período colonial. Las consecuencias de la culpa colectiva también  han sido analizadas. 130 estudiantes universitarios portugueses respondieron a un cuestionario y los resultados muestran que los estudiantes presentan bajos niveles de culpa colectiva en relación a este período. Nuestros resultados muestran que la glorificación del intragrupo está positivamente relacionada con el uso de cogniciones para justificar el comportamiento del propio grupo, así como para, presumiblemente, evitar la responsabilidad por los daños cometidos por el grupo nacional. La identificación con el exogrupo se correlaciona con la intención de compensación y con la apertura a la información negativa acerca de la guerra colonial. Como era de esperar, los sentimientos de culpa colectiva muestran una correlación significativa con la intención de compensación. Las relaciones entre orientación política, el apego y la glorificación del intragrupo, las cogniciones exonerantes y la culpa colectiva, así como sus implicaciones para las relaciones intergrupales serán discutidas.

Copyright
Corresponding author
Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Ana Figueiredo. Faculdade de Psicologia e Ciências da Educação. Universidade de Coimbra. Rua do Colégio Novo. Apartado 61533001-802 Coimbra. (Portugal). E-mail: figueiredo.anacm@gmail.com
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

E. Barkan (2004). Individual versus group rights in Western philosophy and the Law. In N. Branscombe & B. Doosje (Eds.), Collective Guilt — International perspectives (pp. 309319). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

N. Branscombe (2004). A social psychological process perspective on collective guilt. In N. Branscombe & B. Doosje (Eds.), Collective Guilt — International perspectives (pp. 320332). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

N. Branscombe , & B. Doosje (2004). International perspectives on the experience of collective guilt. In N. Branscombe & B. Doosje (Eds.), Collective Guilt — International perspectives (pp. 315). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

N. Branscombe , B. Slugoski , & D. Kappen (2004). The measurement of collective guilt: what it is and what it is not. In N. Branscombe & B. Doosje (Eds.), Collective Guilt — International perspectives (pp. 1634). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

B. Doosje , N. Branscombe , R. Spears , & A. Manstead (1998). Guilty by association: when one's group has a negative history. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 75(4), 872886. doi:10.10370022-3514.75.4.872

B. Doosje , N. Branscombe , R. Spears , & A. Manstead (2004). Consequences of national ingroup identification for responses to immoral historical events. In N. Branscombe & B. Doosje (Eds.), Collective Guilt — International perspectives (pp. 95111). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

A. Iyer , C. Leach , & F. Crosby (2003). White guilt and racial compensation: The benefits and limits of self-focus. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 29(1), 117129. doi:10.1177/0146167202238377

C. Leach , M. Zimeren , S. Zebel , M. Vliek , S. Pennekamp , B. Doosje , … R. Spears (2008). Group-level self-definition and self-investment: A hierarchical (multicomponent) model of in-group identification. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 95(1), 144165. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.95.1.144

B. Lickel , T. Schmader , & M. Barquissau (2004). The evocation of moral emotions in intergroup contexts: The distinction between collective guilt and collective shame. In N. Branscombe & B. Doosje (Eds.), Collective Guilt — International perspectives (pp.3555). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

D. Mackie , L. Silver , & E. Smith (2004). Intergroup emotions: Emotion as an intergroup phenomenon. In L. Tiedens & C. Leach (Eds.), The social life of emotions (pp. 227245). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

R. Mallett , & J. Swim (2004). Collective guilt in the United States: Predicting support for social policies that alleviate social injustice. In N. Branscombe & B. Doosje (Eds.), Collective Guilt — International perspectives (pp. 5674). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

C. McGarty , & A. Bliuc (2004). Refining the meaning of the “collective” in collective guilt: Harm, guilt, and apology in Australia. In N. Branscombe & B. Doosje (Eds.), Collective Guilt — International perspectives (pp. 112129). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

T. F. Pettigrew , & R. W. Meertens (1995). Subtle and blatant prejudice in Western Europe. European Journal of Social Psychology, 25, 5775. doi:10.1002/ejsp.2420250106

L. Rensmann (2004). Collective guilt, national identity and political processes in comtemporary Germany. In N. Branscombe & B. Doosje (Eds.), Collective Guilt — International perspectives (pp. 169190). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

S. Roccas , Y. Klar , & I. Liviatan (2004). Exonerating cognitions, group identification, and personal values as predictors of collective guilt among jewish-israelis. In N. Branscombe & B. Doosje (Eds.), Collective Guilt — International perspectives (pp. 130147). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

S. Roccas , Y. Klar , & I. Liviatan (2006). The paradox of group-based guilt: Modes of national identification, conflict vehemence, and reactions to the ingroup's moral violations. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 91(4), 698711. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.91.4.698

E. R. Smith (1993). Social identity and social emotions: Toward new conceptualization of prejudice. In D. M. Mackie & D. L. Hamilton (Eds.), Affect, cognition and stereotyping (pp. 297315). San Diego, CA: Academic Press.

D. Spini , G. Elecheroth , & R. Fasel (2008). The impact of group norms and generalization of risks across groups on judgements of war behavior. Political Psychology, 29(6), 919941. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9221.2008.00673.x

J. Vala , D. Lopes , & M. Lima (2008). Black immigrants in Portugal: Luso-tropicalism and prejudice. Journal of Social Issues, 64(2), 287302. doi:10.1111/j.1540-4560.2008.00562.x

M. Wohl , & N. Branscombe (2004). Importance of social categorization for forgiveness and collective guilt assignment for the Holocaust. In N. Branscombe & B. Doosje (Eds.), Collective Guilt — International perspectives (pp. 284305). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

M. Wohl , N. Branscombe , & Y. Klar (2006). Collective guilt: Emotional reactions when one's group has done wrong or been wronged. European Review of Social Psychology, 17, 137. doi:10.1080/10463280600574815

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

The Spanish Journal of Psychology
  • ISSN: 1138-7416
  • EISSN: 1988-2904
  • URL: /core/journals/spanish-journal-of-psychology
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 15 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 123 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 22nd July 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.