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INCIDENTAL ACQUISITION OF MULTIWORD EXPRESSIONS THROUGH AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS

THE ROLE OF REPETITION AND TYPOGRAPHIC ENHANCEMENT

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2021

Elvenna Majuddin
Affiliation:
Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington
Anna Siyanova-Chanturia
Affiliation:
Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington and Ocean University of China
Frank Boers
Affiliation:
University of Western Ontario
Corresponding

Abstract

There has been limited research on the efficacy of captioned second language (L2) television in facilitating the incidental acquisition of multiword expressions (MWEs). The present study aims to fill this gap. Additionally, this study examines the role of typographic enhancement and repetition. One-hundred and twenty-two L2 learners were assigned to one of six conditions that differed in terms of caption condition (no captions, normal captions, enhanced captions) and the number of times they watched the same video (once, twice). The participants took a cued MWE form recall test before watching the video, immediately and 2 weeks after watching it. A content comprehension test was also administered. Compared to single viewing, repetition resulted in better content comprehension as well as better acquisition of MWEs. Both caption types positively influenced MWE recall relative to watching the video without captions, but typographic enhancement reduced the benefits of captions for content comprehension.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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Footnotes

This research was supported by Victoria Doctoral Scholarship and the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Research Grant to Elvenna Majuddin. We are grateful to Dr. Lisa Woods, Statistical Consultant, School of Mathematics and Statistics, for her expert advice.

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