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About the cover_212_Issue 1

About the cover_212_Issue 2

About the cover_212 Issue_3

About the cover_212 Issue_4

About the cover_212 Issue 5

Volume 212 Issue 1

Cover illustration by Sharmila Coutinho for Where There is No Psychiatrist, second edition (2017), written by Vikram Patel and Charlotte Hanlon. The newly published second edition of Where There is No Psychiatrist is a practical manual of mental health care for community health workers, primary care nurses, social workers and primary care doctors, particularly in low-resource settings. With over 200 illustrations to aid understanding and simple explanations that avoid jargon, the manual will enable health workers with no specialist training in mental health to help people with mental health problems in their communities and to know when to refer them for specialist assessment. The second edition of this widely used manual will be made freely available as an eBook thanks to generous donations of members and supporters of the Royal College of Psychiatrists.





Volume 212 Issue 2

Self-portrait 2 (unknown year) by Alex Green (b.1981). Alex Green started painting from a very early age. He studied fine art at Leeds Metropolitan University in the early 2000s. He cites his main influences as surrealism, particularly Salvador Dali, but also the work of Turner and Francis Bacon. Alex mainly uses oils, both on a small and very large scale, and has sold some of his work. He tends to focus on portraiture. The painting is one of a number of portraits Alex has painted of himself when psychiatrically unwell. He suffered from treatment resistant psychosis for several years before responding to clozapine. He has also been diagnosed with Huntington’s disease. Alex lives in his home town of Leicester. The above text and the cover picture were submitted for publication by Reza Kiani and Kevin Pierce from Huntington’s Disease Complex Care Services (Mill Lodge) in Leicestershire.




Volume 212 Issue 3

The Diver (2013) by Nathalie Frickey (b.1972). Dr. med. Nathalie Frickey trained and worked in Germany, France and Austria. She is physician-turned-art-therapist and mother of three. She lives and works in Vienna, Austria.In her exploration of the liminal spaces between arts and healing, she uses found imagery, words and found objects in restorative storytelling. All these elements are assembled via collage or poetry into a new and larger whole, reflecting individual and collective growth and evolution. Her personal journey of integrating early childhood trauma, and growing awareness of transgenerational and collective aspects of trauma in various kinds of disease shape her particular approach to art therapy as a healing practice. Her current focus is on working with patients with severe eating disorders and a history of trauma. The Diver is about fear and isolation – total, primal terror, a state of cryopreservation of the self. Individuals with complex post-traumatic stress disorder struggle to regain a sense of safety, to exit that cocoon of icy fear and reconnect with the warp and weft of the world and other people. The inner world experience in this case is quite distinct and different from the outer world experience since the fear itself projects a sphere of altered reality in which the sufferer exists.


Volume 212 Issue 4

The Player (2013) by Nathalie Frickey (b.1972). Dr. med. Nathalie Frickey trained and worked in Germany, France and Austria. She is physician-turned-art-therapist and mother of three. She lives and works in Vienna, Austria. In her exploration of the liminal spaces between arts and healing, she uses found imagery, words and found objects in restorative storytelling. All these elements are assembled via collage or poetry into a new and larger whole, reflecting individual and collective growth and evolution. Her personal journey of integrating early childhood trauma, and growing awareness of transgenerational and collective aspects of trauma in various kinds of disease shape her particular approach to art therapy as a healing practice. Her current focus is on working with patients with severe eating disorders and a history of trauma.

In The Player, Dr Frickey sought a way to express the sense of disconnection from self, to capture the oddness of existing in relationship to others. The hermetically sealed diving helmet, prosthetic limbs, corset and string puppet all fit with this sense of disjointedness, of a pseudo-self persona cobbled together from ill-fitting parts. Shame, fear, confusion and secrecy are recurring aspects in the exploration of post-traumatic disorder, as is a need for rigid control to keep all the pieces from floating apart.

Volume 212 Issue 5

Frau mit totem Kind (Woman with dead child) (1903) by Käthe Kollwitz (1867–1945). Käthe Kollwitz (1867–1945) was a German Expressionist artist. Born in Konigsberg, she suffered anxiety as a child due to the death of her siblings. She went on to train at art schools for women in Berlin and later Munich. In her art, she addressed social and political issues, and was a committed socialist and pacifist. In 1933 after the Nazi Party came to power, her work was banned and she lost her academic post at the Akademie der Kunste. In 1936 she and her husband were threatened with deportation to a concentration camp, but because of her by-now international stature as an artist, no further action was taken.

This powerful, and indeed disturbing, image of a mother cradling her dead child was produced by Kollwitz in 1903. Her son, Peter, who was seven at the time posed for the dead child. With cruel irony he was to be killed in the First World War at the age of eighteen. Kollwitz never fully recovered from his death. In her diaries, she repeatedly described her loss.