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Abnormal Intestinal Permeability

An Aetiological Factor in Chronic Psychiatric Disorders?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

N. C. Wood
Affiliation:
Stratford upon Avon
I. Hamilton
Affiliation:
The General Infirmary, Leeds
A. T. R. Axon*
Affiliation:
The General Infirmary, Leeds
S. A. Khan
Affiliation:
High Royds Hospitals, Menston; Department of Psychiatry & Behavioural Medicine, Peoria, Illinois, 616014, USA
P. Quirke
Affiliation:
University of Leeds
R. H. S. Mindham
Affiliation:
University of Leeds
K. McGuigan
Affiliation:
H.M. Prison, Grendon Underwood, Aylesbury
*
The Gastroenterology Unit, The General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX

Abstract

Abnormal intestinal absorption has been suggested as an aetiological factor in schizophrenia. A procedure for investigating intestinal permeability was carried out in a group of chronic psychiatric in-patients. A proportion of the subjects studied showed abnormal intestinal permeability which could not be attributed to established bowel disease. Patients who were receiving neuroleptic but not anticholinergic drugs were those most often showing abnormal intestinal permeability. This work is at an early stage of development but preliminary findings suggest that further investigations should be carried out to establish the circumstances in which changes in intestinal permeability may be associated with mental illness.

Type
Brief Reports
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 The Royal College of Psychiatrists 

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