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Alexithymia in Women with Anorexia Nervosa

A Preliminary Investigation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Michael P. Bourke
Affiliation:
Royal Masonic Hospital, London, and Blackrock Clinic, Dublin, and St George's Hospital Medical School, London
Graeme J. Taylor*
Affiliation:
University of Toronto and Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5G 1X5
James D. A. Parker
Affiliation:
York University, Ontario
R. Michael Bagby
Affiliation:
University of Toronto and Staff Psychologist, Mood Disorders Program, Clarke Institute of Psychiatry, Toronto
*
Correspondence

Abstract

The prevalence of alexithymia in 48 female anorexia nervosa patients was 77.1% compared with a prevalence of 6.7% in 30 normal female subjects, matched by age and education. Alexithymia correlated negatively with education in the anorexic patient group, but was unrelated to duration of illness, amount of weight loss, and levels of depression and of general psychoneurotic pathology.

Type
Papers
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 The Royal College of Psychiatrists 

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