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Dimensions of Behaviour in Infant School Children

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2018

I. Kolvin
Affiliation:
Currently and previously staff of Nuffield Psychiatric Unit and Department of Psychological Medicine, Queen Victoria Infirmary, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 4LP
S. Wolff
Affiliation:
Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh, EH9 1LF
L. M. Barber
Affiliation:
Currently and previously staff of Nuffield Psychiatric Unit and Department of Psychological Medicine, Queen Victoria Infirmary, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 4LP
E. G. Tweddle
Affiliation:
Currently and previously staff of Nuffield Psychiatric Unit and Department of Psychological Medicine, Queen Victoria Infirmary, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 4LP
R. F. Garside
Affiliation:
Currently and previously staff of Nuffield Psychiatric Unit and Department of Psychological Medicine, Queen Victoria Infirmary, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 4LP
D. McI. Scott
Affiliation:
Currently and previously staff of Nuffield Psychiatric Unit and Department of Psychological Medicine, Queen Victoria Infirmary, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 4LP
S. Chambers
Affiliation:
Currently and previously staff of Nuffield Psychiatric Unit and Department of Psychological Medicine, Queen Victoria Infirmary, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 4LP

Extract

Much attention has been devoted to the classification of the behaviour disorders of childhood, and various authors have identified what they consider to be clinically homogeneous groups. The alternative to a clinical approach to classification is a multivariate approach in an attempt to identify more scientifically the main dimensions underlying the wide range of behaviour disorders that occur in children. A model for a multivariate classification was pioneered by Hewitt and Jenkins (1946), who delineated three behaviour syndromes:

  1. (a) socialized delinquency;

  2. (b) unsocialized aggressive behaviour;

  3. (c) over-inhibited behaviour.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1975 

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References

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