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A Double-Blind Gluten-Free/Gluten-Load Controlled Trial in a Secure Ward Population

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2018

Dimitrios N. Vlissides*
Affiliation:
University of Sheffield, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield S10 2JF
Andrzej Venulet
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Sheffield (now at the Elizabeth Donkin Hospital, Port Elizabeth, Republic of South Africa)
Frederick A. Jenner
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Sheffield, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield S10 2JF
*
Correspondence

Abstract

A double-blind control trial of gluten-free versus a gluten-containing diet was carried out in a ward of maximum security hospital: 24 patients were studied for 14 weeks. Most suffered from psychotic disorders, particularly schizophrenia. Various dimensions of behaviour were rated on the Psychotic In-Patient profile (PIP) at different stages. There were beneficial changes in the whole group of patients between pre-trial and gluten-free period in five dimensions of the PIP, maintained during the gluten challenge period; these changes could be attributed to the attention the patients received. Two patients improved during the gluten-free period and relapsed when the gluten diet was reintroduced.

Type
Papers
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 The Royal College of Psychiatrists 

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