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Thiothixene and Thioridazine in Anxiety

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2018

Karl Rickels
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania, and Philadelphia, General Hospital, 203 Piersol Building, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19104, U.S.A.
Charles C. Weise
Affiliation:
Philadelphia General Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19104, U.S.A.
E. L. Clark
Affiliation:
Philadelphia General Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19104, U.S.A.
B. Wheeler Jenkins
Affiliation:
Philadelphia General Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19104, U.S.A.
Charles K. Rose
Affiliation:
Philadelphia General Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19104, U.S.A.
Howard Rosenfeld
Affiliation:
Philadelphia General Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19104, U.S.A.
Paul E. Gordon
Affiliation:
Philadelphia General Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19104, U.S.A.

Extract

Thiothixene and thioridazine, established anti-psychotic agents (5), have been reported to possess antidepressant (4, 7, 8, 9, 17) and anxiolytic (3, 15, 16) properties. The present study is primarily concerned with the latter claim. It was initiated to assess the role of both these major tranquillizers—thiothixene, a thioxanthene derivative, and thioridazine, a phenothiazine derivative—in the symptomatic treatment of anxious neurotic out-patients.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1974 

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References

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