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Typology of modifications to peer support work for adults with mental health problems: systematic review

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2020

Ashleigh Charles
Affiliation:
Research Assistant, School of Health Sciences, Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham, UK
Dean Thompson
Affiliation:
Research Fellow, Institute of Applied Health Research, University of Birmingham, UK
Rebecca Nixdorf
Affiliation:
Research Assistant, Department of Psychiatry, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany
Grace Ryan
Affiliation:
Research Fellow, Centre of Global Mental Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK
Donat Shamba
Affiliation:
Researcher, Department of Health Systems, Impact Evaluation and Policy, Ifakara Health Institute, Tanzania
Jasmine Kalha
Affiliation:
Centre for Mental Health Law and Policy, Indian Law Society, India
Galia Moran
Affiliation:
Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Humanities and Social Science, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel
Ramona Hiltensperger
Affiliation:
Research Assistant, Department of Psychiatry II, Ulm University, Germany
Candelaria Mahlke
Affiliation:
Researcher, Department of Psychiatry, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany
Bernd Puschner
Affiliation:
Professor, Department of Psychiatry II, Ulm University, Germany
Julie Repper
Affiliation:
Programme Director of ImROC, Nottingham, UK
Mike Slade
Affiliation:
Professor of Mental Health Recovery and Social Inclusion, School of Health Sciences, Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham, UK
Richard Mpango
Affiliation:
Researcher, Butabika National Referral Hospital, Uganda
Corresponding

Abstract

Background

Peer support work roles are being implemented internationally, and increasingly in lower-resource settings. However, there is no framework to inform what types of modifications are needed to address local contextual and cultural aspects.

Aims

To conduct a systematic review identifying a typology of modifications to peer support work for adults with mental health problems.

Method

We systematically reviewed the peer support literature following PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews (registered on PROSPERO (International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews) on 24 July 2018: CRD42018094832). All study designs were eligible and studies were selected according to the stated eligibility criteria and analysed with standardised critical appraisal tools. A narrative synthesis was conducted to identify types of, and rationales for modifications.

Results

A total of 15 300 unique studies were identified, from which 39 studies were included with only one from a low-resource setting. Six types of modifications were identified: role expectations; initial training; type of contact; role extension; workplace support for peer support workers; and recruitment. Five rationales for modifications were identified: to provide best possible peer support; to best meet service user needs; to meet organisational needs, to maximise role clarity; and to address socioeconomic issues.

Conclusions

Peer support work is modified in both pre-planned and unplanned ways when implemented. Considering each identified modification as a candidate change will lead to a more systematic consideration of whether and how to modify peer support in different settings. Future evaluative research of modifiable versus non-modifiable components of peer support work is needed to understand the modifications needed for implementation among different mental health systems and cultural settings.

Type
Review article
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2020

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Footnotes

Declaration of interest: None.

*

Joint first authors.

**

Joint last authors.

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