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The Usefulness of the Clinical Tests of the Sensorium

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2018

Extract

Although the clinical tests of sensorium (CTS) are widely used as a quick check of mental efficiency (Slater and Roth, 1969), they have come together in a haphazard way and their validity has been questioned (Shapiro et al., 1956). For example, a patient may be able to perform well on so-called memory tests such as Digit Span and Babcock Sentence and still have a florid memory disturbance (Roth and Hopkins, 1953; Zangwill, 1946).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1971 

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References

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